How to Make a Headboard Door Pediment

We repurposed an old headboard with just a little work to use it as a decorative door pediment. I shared this a couple of weeks ago at the DIY Club but wanted to share here as well, plus I’m so exhausted. My back and knees are reminding me that I’m not in my 20s anymore and renovating alone is hard work! While working on the apartment renovation for our daughter, our own projects at home have been put on hold but I did manage to squeeze in an easy DIY decorative accent project!

Materials:

  • Old headboard
  • Gorilla Wood Glue
  • Bessy ESZ Clamps (Rockler)
  • TransTint Dye (Rockler0
  • Vinyl stencil (created using Silhouette Cameo)
  • Craft paint and small brush or paint pen

Headboard Pediment Tutorial

I started with removing the legs from a broken headboard. The headboard was beautiful but in very poor condition.

I removed the warped veneer and pulled out staples that were trying to hold it in place to reveal the unfinished wood.

To repair the few cracks int he wood, I filled them with Gorilla Wood Glue. I love it’s water-based formula (easy clean up) and “tough” holding power. It only takes about 20-30 minutes of clamp time to move forward with the project and 24 hours to cure.

I love these awesome HUGE Bessy ESZ clamps!  They were super easy to use one-handed with their pistol style handles. No problems with increasing the grip and super easy to release when done.

After the glue was dry, I applied my vinyl stencil which wouldn’t stick so I traced the letters using a pencil.

Next I hand painted my words tracing the pencil marks with a paint pen and filling in with craft paint and let it dry.

Then, I lightly sanded the entire headboard (even the painted lettering) and gave it a coat of TransTint dye (dark mission brown) to age it.

Once everything was dry, we drilled pilot holes into the studs above the French doors in our family room and into the headboard. We secured it to the wall using drywall screws.

Pardon this mess! Room renovation on hold but in progress {actually it looks a lot messier than the photos at this moment – yikes!}…

Tada! After…

DIY repurposed headboard

I love how it fills the empty space above the French doors? What do you think?

You can see more plans for the family room here:

Operation Family Room

family room design

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ATTENTION! I am judging the Before/After contest at OPC’s Better Half this week and going through the links now. You have 4 weeks to enter and a couple of days before I get through 100+ links for me to see your DIY room makeover. ;)

Rustoleum Countertop Transformations

When I first saw the scratched, lightly burned and stained creamy colored laminate countertop in the rental, I knew I needed  to either board up the door and run for the hills or an affordable and easy DIY solution. Rustoleum’s Countertop Transformations kit was a great way to rescue this kitchen.

kitchen before…

apartment kitchen before

Rustoleum’s Countertop Transformations kit comes in 5 colors: Onyx, Charcoal, Java Stone, Desert Sand and Pebbled Ivory. Since the previous light color was stained, I decided to go with a darker color to avoid the same issue in the future. “Sleek and contemporary, Onyx is one of today’s most-sought after colors. Onyx’s black gleaming finish will modernize your kitchen and accent any decor. It perfectly complements kitchens with stark colors, white cabinets and stainless steel appliances.” The description sold me…an easy DIY way to modernize a kitchen?

A DIY option that doesn’t include removing the old and measuring for new, cutting new/etc.? Count me in! There’s a lot of DIY going on in this apartment and budget friendly, easy choices are a huge help!

I’m often asked about this DIY kit, so it was great to have the opportunity to give it a try for myself. Summary? Definitely worth the money and work to achieve the look of a brand new countertop!

My Rustoleum Countertop Transformations Experience

I read through the instructions. I also wrote down highlights when I watched the instructional DVD. The kit includes nearly everything but I did have to purchase 2 angled 2″ brushes, gloves, a 6″ microfiber roller and a 6″ foam roller (shown on the outside of the box). A shop vac is handy too.

I set up a work station close by with all of the materials on hand and ready to go.

countertop transformations prep

and prepped the area using plastic drop cloths and FrogTape. I did not remove the sink, however removing the sink will make the process much easier.

laminate countertop before

Tip: I taped around the sink. However, if you have a steady hand and an angled brush, I think it’s easier to wipe away basecoat when you get it on the sink. Tape will peel away some of the finish and require touch ups but those are super easy to do too! More on that below. Tape off wall near backsplash, cover cabinets, appliances (if near by) and floor with plastic drop cloths.

The first step is to sand the counters using the diamond embedded sanding block (provided in kit) to remove the shine from the laminate, sanding in a circular motion. It actually not only removed the glossy finish but the some of the stains as well. This is by far the hardest step – not too difficult, just time consuming and requires some muscle.

sanding laminate countertop

{as you can see above, I removed the loose laminate side strips because they were not secure and applied each step to the non-laminated sides}

Once the sanding was done, I cleaned the countertops with a damp cloth, removing all of the dust (several times) then let them dry.

Step 2 is applying the adhesive base coat. Have the materials ready to go including: adhesive base coat, wetting spray, paint tray and microfiber roller, 2″ angled brush and decorative color chips (in the spreader). Stir the adhesive base coat.

Rustoleum Countertop Transformations

Starting with the backsplash area, apply a heavy coat (like icing on a cake) of the adhesive base coat to the top and front of the backsplash and two inches of the countertop against the backsplash. Use the brush to apply the adhesive base coat to the sides and front of the countertop. Pour the adhesive base coat into the paint tray and roll onto the large flat area of the countertop. Make sure that none of the countertop shows through. Work quickly!

adhesive base coat

adhesive base coat around sink

Once every spot is covered, quickly move to the next steps. Spray the wetting agent and spread decorative color chips using the spreader according to instructions. Take handfuls and apply decorative color chips in hard to reach places, covering every area of adhesive base coat. There are plenty of decorative chips. Spare no expense!

applying decorative color chips

It does make quite a mess but don’t worry, they’re very easy to sweep up. I let this sit overnight then swept up the excess decorative color chips with a shop vac.

sweeping chips

It’s starting to look awesome!

laminate countertop transformation

Using the scraper provided, start removing build up of dried decorative chips along the coated surfaces (being careful not to dig or remove too much).

scraping decorative color chips

Next, using the sanding block in the kit, sand down the decorative color chips. And sand some more. And sand again.

sanding decorative color chips

Vacuum up the dust

vaccum

and compare the sanded countertop with the sample piece.

textured sample

Sand and vacuum again if needed.

sanding and vacuuming countertop

Clean with a damp cloth, making sure to get all of the dust removed and let dry. Score the FrogTape with a utility knife (we only had a razor on hand) and remove tape.

removing FrogTape

Touch ups: When I removed my FrogTape from around the sink, it did peel away some of the finish. Not to worry. Simply touch up with the adhesive base coat using a foam brush, (wipe away base coat if it gets onto the sink/etc.), apply decorative chips and wait four hours.

Rustoleum countertop touch up

Sweep up the chips. Sand. Clean.

Tip: Note that this process is messy and remember to over protect areas you don’t want involved. I have a little paint touch ups to do.

touch up needed

Again, make sure countertops are completely dust/dirt free and dry. {looking better already, isn’t it?}

cleaning countertop

On to the last step! Once the countertop has been sanded and cleaned, gather supplies and pour Part A of the protective coat with Part B and stir.

mixing Rustoleum countertop transformations

Apply the protective clear coat starting with the top and front of the backsplash and onto about 2 inches of the level countertop. Pour some of the protective coat into a paint tray and apply to the flat areas of the countertop using the foam roller. Don’t forget to apply protective coat to the sides also.

apply protective coat

Keep kids and pets out of the room until the protective coat dries to avoid fingerprints, pet hair, etc. in the finish.

The transformation is amazing. What a gorgeous finish and huge improvement!

rustoleum countertop transformations onyx

Let dry 48 hours for light use and 7 days to fully cure for normal use.

Thoughts: This do-it-yourself Rustoleum Countertop Transformations kit is messy but easy to use, an affordable option and the result is gorgeous. Dried nice to a nice hard finish. The countertop feels durable and looks 100% better! We’re thrilled with the results! Thanks to Bri for her help with this project! Two people are definitely better than one!

Rustoleum Countertop Transformations before and after

What do you think? Have you tried the Rustoleum Countertop Transformations?

Rustoleum Countertop Transformations After - Onyx

Thinking about it? I hope sharing our experience helps! This YouTube video shares DIY tips.

Up next…oh yes I did! I painted those cabinets! I’ll share the process next week. But here’s a sneak peek…

DIY countertop and cabinets

You might also be interested in Rustoleum Cabinet Transformations…making painting cabinets easy (no sanding!):

pure white

 

I did receive product (Rustoleum Countertop Transformations kit) in exchange for a review however experience, pictures and opinion are my own. For more information about Rustoleum Countertop Transformations including a how-to-guide, colors, virtual tool, photo gallery with before and after pictures and where to buy, visit Rustoleum Countertop Transformations

This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience. 

FrogTape Blog Squad

How to Make a Bean Bag Toss Scoreboard

At mom’s pool on Sunday, you’ll find family members swimming, eating, laughing and a bean bag tournament in progress {also known as ‘cornhole’}.

cornhole

There are two teams tossing bean bags. It’s similar to playing horseshoes except that bean bags are tossed to a platform with a hole. Points are earned when the bean bag lands in the hole or on the platform. Teams can also knock their opponents bean bags in or out. Game ends when a team has reached 21. Up until now, score keeping was done mentally but for Father’s Day, I made a DIY bean bag toss scoreboard.

Bean Bag Toss Scoreboard Tutorial

Materials:

  • 1×3 wooden beam (my piece was about 6 ft. tall)
  • primer
  • 2 colors of paint (I used latex semi gloss in white and mustard acrylic craft paint)
  • paint marker (in black)
  • FrogTape (I used the yellow Delicate Surface FrogTape)
  • 2 small pieces of dowel rod (about 2 in. each) small enough to fit into the holes of:
  • 2 small wooden wheels
  • Gorilla Wood Glue
  • 2 thumb tacks
  • craft paint (I used red and blue)
  • Krylon Crystal Clear (Indoor/Outdoor protective clear coat – satin finish)

I cut my 1×3 to about 6 ft. and used the miter saw to make one end into a ‘point’ like a garden stake.

bean bag scoreboard

I applied a coat of primer and two top coats of paint (allow to dry between each coat).

Next, using a 2″ scrap piece of wood to measure, I drew pencil lines creating 22 separate ‘boxes’ (using the scrap piece means my boxes are approx. 2″, starting from the top and working my way towards the garden stake point. {shown measuring on unpainted wood…but…do this step after wood is painted base color}

marking bean bag toss scoreboard

Using FrogTape, I taped off every other “box”, starting with the bottom box so it would be painted with the accent color (yellow). I made sure I rubbed the edges (burnished) for a good seal on the edges of the tape. Since I had just recently painted the white base color, I used Delicate Surface FrogTape because it’s safe to use on freshly painted surfaces (but at least 24 hrs) since it’s has a more gentle adhesive.

Interesting FrogTape fact: FrogTape is the only tape treated with patented PaintBlock Technology. PaintBlock is a super-absorbent polymer which reacts with latex paint and instantly gels to form a micro-barrier that seals the edges of the tape, preventing paint bleed.

FrogTape Delicate Surface

Tape on the ‘outside” of the pencil lines for every other square to be painted an alternating accent color.

painting bean bag toss scoreboard

I gave each accent colored box 2 coats of paint and immediately removed the tape after the second coat.

removing FrogTape Delicate Surface on project

Once that was dry, I used a paint pen/marker to number “0″ to “21″ going from bottom to top in every box.

DIY bean bag toss scoreboard

While paint was drying in the steps listed above, I worked on the ‘point markers’. I painted (two coats) one dowel/one wooden wheel set red and the other blue. TIP: In hind site – use Gorilla Glue and insert the dowel rod into the wooden wheel and allow to dry before painting (painting them separate will make it harder to fit the dowel into the wheel hole).

Once glued, painted and dried, I added a push pin (coordinating color) into the dowel rod where in the center of the wooden wheel to give it a more finished game piece look.

making bean bag toss game pieces

Back to the scoreboard: Once my painted numbers were dry, we drilled holes (that fit the dowel rod) into the side of the numbered sections. Choose a bit that will go all the way through. When finished, I pushed a screwdriver into the holes and rolled it around a little to smooth out the drilled space.

Sand a little and touch up paint.

I gave the score board and score keeping pieces a couple of coats of Krylon’s Crystal Clear. Dries in 10 minutes and everything has a protective coat.

I also used a little wax on the end of each dowel rod so they would fit into the drilled holes for score keeping a little easier.

Now, bean bag score keeping is more accurate and no one has to ask “what is the score again?”

how to make a cornhole scoreboard

Does your family play this game at summer get-togethers? What do you think? Purchasing a scoreboard online ranged from $25 to $90! My DIY version was less than $20 and coordinates with the Steeler’s themed bean bag toss at my mom’s. Just in time for Labor Day picnics and a family reunion. :)

Note: We will add a piece of gutter spout into the ground for holding the scoreboard in place but it could also be pounded into the ground, attached to a bench, etc.

This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience. Need some FrogTape project inspiration? Check out the FrogTape blog squad with projects being updated/added frequently for more ideas!

FrogTape Blog Squad

How to turn a coffee table into an ottoman ~ Inside Out Design

Brooke from Inside Out Design is sharing how to turn an old coffee table into a tufted ottoman. It takes a little work, but transforming an old coffee table with some foam and fabric can make add a beautiful element to your existing living room space. I do have an old coffee table hanging out in the basement and Brooke’s tutorial is an inspiration!

Brooke’s coffee table is actually pretty cute with a painted stencil design but she felt the height was wrong for her couch, wanted to add a beautiful designer fabric to her living room (sometimes throw pillows aren’t the answer) and having a comfy place to prop feet is always a bonus. I know I’m always propping my feet up onto a glass coffee table and it’s not ever comfortable. ::envisions of basement coffee table with a new look and coffee foot prop::

painted stenciled coffee table

Quick summary:

To adjust the height, Brooke and her husband cut (and painted/distressed) the existing lets and reattached them.

distressed coffee table legs

Next, they added a frame so that it’d look more like an ottoman and less like a coffee table. The new wooden frame will support the new upholstery and hides the drawer.

ottoman frame

A little math for spacing and a chalkline create a grid for drilling tufting holes…

ottoman tufting holes

They ordered pre-cut foam (awesome! see original post for details) and attached to the wooden frame using spray adhesive.
Add batting by stapling to the wood frame…
then fabric…
What a transformation! It looks good just like this…
But of course, tufting makes everything better. Brooke made up some buttons with the fabric and created some tufts (link to tutorial below). The final result is stunning and a beautiful addition to her living room!
tufted upholstered ottoman Isn’t it gorgeous? Repurposing the old coffee table was a genius idea! And what a beautiful home surrounding it!

You can get the full details at Inside Out Design:

Part 1 – Turning a coffee table into an upholstered ottoman

Part 2 – Upholstered ottoman tufting tips

Another coffee table turned upholstered ottoman tutorial HERE. DIY upholstered tufted ottoman tutorial

 

and more DIY coffee table ideas.

Tiffany & Co. spray painted steamer trunk

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Family Room – sneak peek {repurposed headboard to door pediment}

The family room makeover has been on hold while we’re renovating the apartment but I wanted to share a little repurposed headboard project I finished up a couple of weeks ago.

Using an old headboard {a gift from Amber – thanks, Amber!}, Gorilla Wood Glue, Bessy ESZ Clamps (Rockler), TransTint Dye, vinyl stencil (created using Silhouette Cameo) and craft paint, I gave an old headboad a new purpose.

Here’s a little of what’s going on in the family room:

family room design

{see more about operation family room here}

The headboard was in very poor condition, broken and falling apart. I removed the legs and repaired the main wooden part of the headboard and added a stencil.

Before…{pardon the mess, it’s a work in progress!}
So easy! The space above the family room door just needed something, ya know? {French door color is Benjamin Moore Pacific Ocean Blue with a dark glaze}.
Much better, don’t you think?
Happy Friday! Enjoy the weekend!
DIY Club Photobucket
Funky Junk's Sat Nite Special SouthernHospThriftyTreasures copy_thumb

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Thrifty Treasure Transformation – colorful candlesticks

I shared this over at the DIY Club a few weeks ago but wanted to share here too. When I saw this Martha Stewart image…I loved the coordinating colorful candles and candlesticks.

colorful candlesticks

So, I started collecting wooden candlesticks from thrift stores and yard sales…

 wooden candlesticks

I wanted a fun colorful accent to go with our family room plans: family room design

What I used:

  • Wooden candle sticks
  • Candles (color matching my Patio Paints)
  • Deco Art Patio Paint (dark eucalyptus green, waterfall, fuchsia, buttercup)
  • Deco Art Patio Paint reusable Home & Garden stick on stencils
  • dark glaze (TransTint Dye by Rockler)

How I did it:

1. I gave my wooden candlesticks a few coats of Patio Paint each. Because I didn’t sand the wood, I used a dry brush technique. I preferred an antiqued look. I let the candlesticks dry between coats.

2. I brushed on and wiped off my glaze (TransTint dye) to give it an old finish.

3. The Deco Art stencil was sticky (and reusable) making stenciling super easy:

 

Ta-da!

painted candlesticks

{fabric is waverly santa maria desert flower – I’ll be using it for my drapes}

Love them – fun colorful accent to add to our family room…if I can ever get back to working on the makeover!

DIY Club
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How to make an established/monogrammed sign {bridal shower gift}

I’ve always wanted to make an established sign as a gift and a recent bridal shower was the perfect occasion.

How to make an established/monogrammed sign.

Materials:

  • Wood 18 x 9 x 1
  • TransTint Dye (Dark Walnut or Dark Mission Brown)
  • Craft Paint (gray and white)
  • Stencil (I used a vinyl stencil I created with my Silhouette Cameo)
  • Spray Lacquer
  • Sawtooth picture hanger

Tutorial:

I sanded down a pretty piece of wood then died it with my favorite color of TransTint Dye from Rockler a long time ago as part of my participation with the DIY Club. I seriously love this product. A little goes a long way and I can control the color – just add water. I also love that I can let the unused portion sit on a shelf. Water evaporates and I can just add water to re-use the unused portion. I’ve used it on many projects and have so much left!

transtint dye

Using my Silhouette Cameo, I designed and cut out a monogram, border and last name vinyl stencil. {Be sure to measure the sign and create a border/design that fits within those measurements.}

Silhouette Cameo

I peeled off the letters and used the “negative” part of the vinyl as a stencil. Placing it straight was the hardest part. Holding it up to the light and cutting straight lines using the guide on the back of the vinyl was helpful.

Silhouette Cameo vinyl monogram

I pulled away the wax paper, applied the vinyl stencil and made sure it was all good and stuck by rubbing the design with a credit card.

DIY vinyl

Slowly peel away the backing…

DIY sign tutorial

Next I painted the border, monogram and “established 2012″ using gray acrylic craft paint. I gave it a few coats.

DIY painted sign

I’m impatient, so I let it dry a few minutes then peeled away the vinyl. Then I let it dry fully.

DIY monogram sign

I created another vinyl stencil of the last name and cut it out using my Silhouette Cameo. Once the first paint was dry, I followed the same steps to apply the last name stencil. I placed the name in the center of the sign and used white paint.

DIY gift sign

Let dry. Last step is to attach a hanger to the back {make sure the nails/screws aren’t bigger than the depth of the wooden sign!}. I also gave my sign a coat of spray satin matte lacquer.

sawtooth sign hanger

Ta-da! I personalized gift:

DIY established monogram sign

{So sorry about the low light/poor quality pictures! Ugh! I didn’t realize until pictures were uploaded after the gift was given.}

What do you think?

Wish me luck today. I’m heading to the apartment (enlisting the help of my 19-year-old nephew) to tackle my first attempt to sand hardwood floors!

Enjoy the weekend!

OH! It’s the LAST CHANCE TO ENTER THE BETTER HOMES & GARDENS “Color Guide” and  ”New Cottage Style” decorating book giveaway. Need some inspiration? Stop over to enter to win!

BHG Decorating Book Giveaway

bhg.book.collage

Disclaimer: I created the above project using some supplies I’ve received in the past for previously sponsored projects. Opinion is my all mine based on my experience.

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Peacock Blue Painted/Glazed Table Tutorial

Hello! I am Amanda and I blog at mommy is coocoo.
~ My blog is all about fun! ~

mommy is coo coo

Whether you are laughing about the realities of marriage and motherhood or being inspired to make your everyday surroundings lovely, regardless of your budget.

I am especially honored to be doing a guest post for the DIY Show Off.  Roeshel was the first blogger to ever feature this crazy momma and we’ve been blogging friends ever since.
Today I’d like to share a simple glazing tutorial with you. You can see how I turned a $60 craigslist table into this peacock blue masterpiece.
 
I found a table on Craigslist (and Mr. coocoo went and purchased the table with his hard earned money, on his day off.)  I was inspired by several pretty round tables (see those here).
My favorite inspiration table was blue so, out came my peacock blue paint, glaze, and lacquer and my cheap table became the focal point of my family eating area.
How to glaze painted furniture coocoo momma style:
{Before I get started, I would like to say you can do it too! It’s not that difficult, I promise.}
    • I bought a gallon of peacock blue paint from Wal-Mart (cost about $13).
    • I lightly sanded the top of my table with my hand held sander.
    • (and then) I just started painting (see it’s really not that difficult). Paint the entire table and let all the paint dry.
  • Now it’s time to glaze. I bought glaze from Lowe’s or Home Depot (I can’t remember which one). If you aren’t sure what to do, go to the paint department find an employee and tell them you need some glaze. Viola! You will walk out (for about $25 bucks) with something like this.
  • Mix the glaze with whatever paint color you want to add to your already painted furniture. Does this seem scary? It’s not. I chose black paint but you could use whatever color you like.
  • I mixed equal parts glaze and black paint. If this is your first time to glaze don’t freak out, you may want to start out with more glaze and less paint. You can always add more paint to your glaze/paint mixture.
  • Make sure your table is clean (wipe all the dust off from when you sanded).
  • Start glazing! It’s just like regular painting now (clearly, you don’t need a new paint brush). I like to use long horizontal paint strokes. Don’t panic if you get too much paint in one spot! Keep your brush moving. You are going to love it!
  • After your first coat of glaze dries decide if you want to add more glaze (I did because I wanted my table to be a little bit darker. It’s all about preference).
  • Finally, I added this protective finish (bought at Wal-Mart) to the table (This step is a lot of work but it is worth it! Follow the instructions on the can).
The coocoo kitchen table! We love it!
I never had a round table growing up. Did you?

I really enjoy how close we are now when we are eating.  Since there is no chance I am going to be able to eat a meal without helping (at least) three other people, the round table makes it much easier for me to serve, cut food, wash hands and faces, and give Scary Mommy looks when the coocoo kids aren’t eating their food.
Thank you so much for allowing me to share today Roeshel!If you’d like to see more of my projects or meet the whole coocoo family head on over to mommy is coocoo.
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Dining Room Plate Wall

I love the look of plate walls – a great way to fill a wall with so many options to fit your own personal style.

Meet: Hilary from My So-Called Home.

dining room before

Hilary shares my issues with indecision. What to put on the walls? She finally realized it would be better to put something there and change her mind later on than to do nothing at all. And of course, lots of Pinterest browsing helped, specifically these two lovely rooms:

Then her idea became a reality. Now all she needed was a whole mess of random plates and she knew exactly where to get them– the same place she scored her awesome campaign dresser. This place has more dishes so many dishes (how dreamy!) Most of the dishes Hilary got were about 50¢ each.

Hilary washed and dried and numbered (masking tape) her plates.

Secret: One of her plates is not actually ceramic but this sweet little incredibly tarnished silver dish that took a couple coats of primer and white paint to fit in with the rest.

 

Hilary found adhesive cloth hook hangers in the “hooks and hangers” section at Lowe’s.

Hilary used paper plates and paper patterns to create a template.

Before:

And After!

 

 

Who knew that a few thrift store plates could create such a big fun impact?

Hilary is also happy to report that three moons have passed since these plates went up and they’re all holding strong.

I love Hilary’s collection of plates. I also love every other dining room detail. A beautiful appetizing dining area.

Do you have a plate wall?

I have a dining room plate wall too. Let me clean up in there and I’ll share an update in the near future. Hilary, thanks for sharing your beautiful dining room, inspiring plate wall and tips for a hanging! Pop over to see more budget friendly LOVELY DIY at My So Called Home.
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DIY Starfish Chandelier

When I first ‘e-met’ Debi from

Debi's Design Diary

and first saw her gorgeous starfish tutorial and adorable video,

starfish chandelier

I was hooked. I couldn’t resist checking out all of her cute videos and creative DIY ideas.

Today Debi shares a few tips for making this pretty blingy starfish chandelier. Here she is:

I wanted to create a light fixture that had all of the wow factor of a chandelier dripping with crystals but without the big price tag.
I used 36 white starfish and about 10 yards.
I have to say that every project I dream up has it’s challenges and this was no exception. 
Here are some important tips I discovered along the way:
Use a small dremel if you have one, it is much easier on the delicate sea stars and you will have more control when you get to the part where you need to drill the extra holes as the starfish are hanging on the chandelier.
Lay your starfish out in a mock set up to determine how many to use and how they will hang, I used a total of 36 starfish,( 12 strands of three). six of the stands had 3inch links of chain a at the top to attach to the metal ring and the other six 1.5 inch links. I did this to stagger the starfish so they would not bang into each other or overlap too much.
Keep in mind that the bottom starfish on the strand only needs one hole but the rest of them will need two or more.
E600 is the glue I used, although it  is messy and needs to be used in a well ventilated area it works well. You can find this glue at Walmart or Michaels.
of crystal chain and about 10 yards of rhinestone chain.
Ps. Materials (and this chandelier – just 1!) can be found in Debi’s Etsy Shop: Debi’s Design Diary.

Thanks, Debi! If you’re attempting this project {or even if you’re not}, check out her video tutorial for tips and to get a glimpse of the girl behind the blog. I love it!

See more inspiring ideas at Debi’s Design Diary.
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Add color to a rug

I recently purchased this indoor/outdoor area rug from Joss & Main to use right inside our French doors in the kitchen. For double French doors, I like having large mat.

Sphinx indoor outdoor Montego Hampton area rug

Join Joss & Main here {affiliate link: each time a friend joins through my link, I earn credit…so thank you} – exclusive deals on awesome decorating finds for members. When doing a Google search for this area rug, the best price I saw was $89. Joss & Main price: $49! Events change frequently but there are always great prices!

I love the pattern and colors but it was missing just a touch of red with the accents we’ve been adding…

red dresser makeover

I painted the microwave cart {dresser} and “Farmer’s Market” sign using Deco Art’s Americana acrylic craft paint “Tuscan Red”. Yes, I used acrylic craft paint on the dresser (it’s okay – it’s sealed and I just LOVE this shade of red). You didn’t think it was for crafts only, did you? Sometimes I’m such a rebel. ha!

adding color to a rug

With the same paint, I went over some of the sage green design in the area rug to give it just a little more color. Nothing major but it ties in a lot better…

painting a rug

Perfect!

  kitchen entry

Another fun way to add color to a door mat is with the Vecco welcome rug kit. What’s Vecco?

Vecco custom welcome rug

It is a kit for creating rugs and carpets inspired by you. With stencils,colorant sprays and sealants, you make custom designs that’ll tie any room together – you choose the design. You choose the color!




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Styrofoam Convex Mirror Tutorial

I got crafty at the DIY Club recently. Loving most things Pottery Barn, these PB Found Parat Mirrors were on my birthday wish list but that day came and went and besides…

parat mirrors

they aren’t convex mirrors and the price tag of $79/each isn’t something I’d really want to spend. Lamps Plus has this LARGE convex beauty for $104. Definitely not in my budget.

convex wall mirror

I’ve always wanted to do something with convex mirrors so I decided to create a DIY version.

Materials:

  • Styrofoam 12″ wreath forms (I used 3)
  • DecoArt MagiKote
  • Dark brown spray paint
  • DecoArt Americana paints (Ebony and Traditional Burnt Umber)
  • Hot glue
  • 8 1/2″ Convex mirror (x3) affiliate link:

Tutorial:

1. Using a foam brush, coat the top and sides of Styrofoam wreath form and let dry.

The DecoArt MagiKote seals the Styrofoam, creating a paintable surface.

Without on the left, MagiKote on the right…

2. Give each Styrofoam wreath form 2 coats of spray paint (dry between coats).

3. Remove brackets from back of convex mirrors.

4. Attach convex mirrors to center of wreath with hot glue. I used hot glue on the back of each mirror. Once in applied to the Styrofoam in the center, I used hot glue around the perimeter of each mirror too.

5. Touch up with Americana paints.

6. Let dry and hang using Command velcro strips.

What do you think?  {besides the fact that the top one is a little off?!} It’s okay. They’ve since been moved and are now aligned.

I love them as they were but I can never leave well enough alone so I’ve done a little embellishing using beaded garland (attached with hot glue)…

beaded detail on DIY convex mirror

My convex mirrors are hanging using Command Velco Strips.

DIY convex mirror

These will go in our master bedroom makeover but for now I’m liking them here, in the family room

DIY convex mirror tutorial

…until next week when you’re likely to see them moved again. It’s a sickness. I just love rearranging. You know you do that too right? . . .

They’d look fab horizontally displayed too!

DIY convex mirror project

Like this project? I’d love for you to share! 

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DIY Club

Take Heart – DIY paper leaves wreath tutorial

Hi DIY friends! I’d like to introduce you to Danielle from

take heart.

Danielle’s blog is filled with her every day, musings on motherhood, DIYs, style, design, and a little bit of everything else. Today she’s sharing steps to create a beautiful paper leaves wreath…

Let’s get started, shall we?
You can also make a ring from made cardboard, a paper plate even…whatever you have laying around.
step 1: Make a leaf template and trace it onto your scrap book paper. Danielle made about 60 leaves.
2. Cut out the leaves.
3. Pinch the bottom of your leaf together, causing the sides to curve in, and staple.
4. Repeat sixty times. {no pain no gain no wreath}
5. Hot glue your leaves onto your wreath base. {If you are using a cardboard ring, paper plate, etc. you can staple your leaves on.}
6. Continue placing your leaves, all in the same direction (Danielle developed a pattern to prevent the same colors from being placed side by side.)
…carry on.
…so on and so forth.
7. Voila! Add some ribbon to the back or just hang it up as is.
and there you have it.
Happy crafting!
Super cute and you probably even have the supplies already on hand just waiting for a creative idea. Sounds easy enough, looks amazing enough.
Thanks for sharing, Danielle! I love it! A great project for all of that pretty scrapbook paper I can’t seem to stop collecting.
See more DIY from Danielle at Take Heart.

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Family Room Baseboard {DIY installation and caulking tutorial}

The old baseboards in the family room were 2 inches tall and lacked the character displayed in the rest of our home. The family room was a later addition to the house. After the bamboo floor was installed, we decided to go with a taller baseboard. I chose 6 x 1 inch pine.

Before…

baseboard tutorial

I started to the left of the French doors, measured and cut my board to fit the space. I do not miter baseboards. When you see the finished job, I promise you no one is going to notice that the joints/corners are not mitered.

baseboard tutorial

I moved along, placing my next un-cut 8 foot piece into place from the corner.

baseboard tutorial

Moving along to my third piece, I butted it up against the far wall to where it meets the second un-cut piece placed and draw a line where the two boards meet. This is where I’ll cut.

baseboard tutorial

So simple. I cut all of my pieces and ‘framed’ the room. {pardon the old hunter green furniture}

baseboard tutorial

Starting with “A”, I label each board so I know the order they are to be placed around the room. I got up to “K” I think. You can mark the wall too, but just having the boards in order and knowing where you start works.

Next I hauled the boards to the basement and gave each piece of baseboard two coats of paint {Benjamin Moore Chantilly Lace in a semi-gloss finish) on three sides.

painting baseboards

My Porter Cable nail gun/compressor makes installing baseboards super easy.

Porter Cable nail gun & compressor

I just a nail every 14 inches near the bottom of the boards and a staggering nail near the top in between the bottom nails.

baseboard tutorial

{bad hair day = hood for pics and if you misplace safety goggles, sunglasses are the next best thing}

Our walls are not plumb. There are gaps where the baseboards gap and don’t sit flush against the wall. But that’s okay.

DAP Dyna Flex and FrogTape

Enter: DAP DynaFlex. DynaFlex is DAP’s most advanced indoor/outdoor premium latex sealant with technology that is both waterproof and paintable. It combines outstanding durability, adhesion and flexibility with easy tooling, paintability, and low odor, while also keeping insects (SPIDERS!) from entering through small gaps and cracks. It is mold and mildew resistant, making DynaFlex ideal for a wide variety of projects such as sealing around windows, doors, siding, trim, molding and baseboards.

I usually leave caulking to Mr. DIY but this time I did it myself. We’ve been really busy with real life things, so this is a task I kept putting off thinking it would be more difficult and take more time than it did. I was wrong! Caulking is the easiest DIY job I’ve ever done. And it took only about an hour.

Seriously the hardest part was learning how to load the caulk gun. Cut the caulk tube on an angle creating a small hole. And insert the tube into the gun.

DAP Dyna Flex

Handle up means “on”. Handle down means off.

caulk gun

Turn the tip of the tube so the flat side of the angled cut will rest in the ‘crack’ where baseboard meets wall.

Turn handle up to “on” (work quickly with a full tube – it pushes itself out!) and push the metal tab to start placing a bead of caulk in where the baseboard meets the wall, move along. Push. Release. Push. to maintain a steady bead. I worked in 4 foot sections. (Tip: With a new tube, be QUICK with turning the gun off an on – it will continue to squeeze out when you aren’t looking!) Remember to turn handle to ‘off’ position when you set down the caulk. As the tube empties, it will require more gripping muscle.

I had a small dish of water, a small waste basket and lots of paper towels on hand.

Dip finger into water and smooth out the bead of caulk (paper towels or rags are necessary). If it gets onto something it shouldn’t, it’s okay. It wipes/washes right off.

It created a beautiful straight flat bead filling in the gap between the wall and baseboard.

how to caulk

At first I even lined the top of the baseboard and the wall where it meets the baseboard with Frog tape to create a straighter line.

caulk installation collage

But found that the extra step wasn’t really necessary. It might be helpful if you had a big contrast between baseboards and walls. But if I made a mess or an ‘oops’, DynaFlex was easy to wipe away/clean when wet.

before

baseboard tutorial

then…{better but yikes!}

DIY baseboard tutorial

now…

DAP Dyna Flex baseboard caulking tutorial

Family room still in progress but these small details are important. DAP Dyna Flex is sandable and paintable! It’s tempting to end at this step because it looks good enough, but painting will help seal everything and give it a uniform look. Next up filling the nail holes, light sanding and paint touch up. What do you think? An easy enough project to do on my own.

DIY baseboard tutorial

Cost:  approx. $100 for wood and caulk (less than two tubes) for an approx. 200 sq. foot room.

This post is sponsored by DAP but opinion, photos and tutorial are my own. 



Rustic DIY and Enamel Tag Tutorial

  • Beautiful reclaimed barnwood
  • Lovely painted distressed furniture
  • Numbers!

I love each of those things, don’t you? Meet: Kimberly from

serendipity blog

Kimberly is a professional home stager and decorator and a nature at decorating and do-it-yourself projects. Here are some of my favorites:

100 year old reclaimed barnwood before:

reclaimed barnwood

Now: Reclaimed Barnwood Hutch

DIY barnwood hutch

Love!

Dresser Before and After

And a tired old dresser before…

wood dresser before

gets a new distressed paint technique and a new purpose in the dining room… oh-la-la!

painted distressed dresser

See those pretty number tags too? I don’t know what it is about numbers but I love the charm it adds to decor, don’t you? Kimberly shares how to make these sweet little charms…

Here’s what you need:

  • Key tag blanks. (I got mine from Ace Hardware, they are steel with a brass finish and are about 1 and 1/2″ across)
  • Paint and primer (white..but I’m considering doing some blue  or dark green ones with white numbers)
  • StazOn Stamp Ink (and number stamps)
  • Embossing Enamel (clear)
Prime and paint the tags. Once dry, stamp the numbers using StazOn.
Line a skillet (frying pan) with foil. (or use an electric skillet). Place the tag on the foil and sprinkle with the embossing powder.
Turn the heat to medium and watch as the embossing powder turns to liquid.
enamel tag tutorial
When the embossing powder is completely smooth and transparent, gently remove the foil (with the tag on it) from the pan and place it on a rack to cool.
When the tag is partly cool, but before it is completely cool, gently peel the foil from the tag. and return the tag to the rack until it is completely cool. I also used a nail to remove the powder which had filled the hole while the tag was still warm.
So cool!
To pin from original sources and to see more creative DIY and decorating from Kimberly, visit Serendipity.

For more information on enamel tags, see the original inspiration at Can’t Stop Making Things.

Easy Ottoman Makeover

Wow! Martha from

Leone Design

makes her ottoman makeover so easy, I want to tear mine apart right now and give it a makeover! Take a look at this for inspiration:

Thrift store ottoman – before shot:

1. First, remove upholstery nails and save for use on the finished piece.
2. She covered the top and sides with the same fabric (so that it would show through the burlap).
3. Next she covered the sides with strips of coffee sacks.

4. She painted the legs to bring the light cream.
5. Martha used tacky glue and duct tape (to hold in place) to tack down the sides/seams.

After an hour or so of drying, She simply removed the duct tape.

Isn’t this so fun? I love the mix of striped fabric with grain sack burlap! Great job, Martha!



What do you think? Love it, right?!

To pin from the original source and see more amazing DIY from Martha (so many furniture makeovers with lots of helpful tips) at

leonedesign.wordpress.com.


Cork/Chalkboard Tutorial

Have you ever wondered what to do with a collection of wine corks? I love this awesome project from Laura at

Top This Top That

who combines corks + wood trim + chalkboard to create a beautifully framed cork board/chalkboard. (Warning: This project may encourage more wine drinking.) Here’s how she made hers:

Materials needed
  • Wine corks- lots of them (Laura used 350!)
  • Piece of MDF-  pre-cut to 36inch x 24inch
  • trim for the outside frame
  • picture frame for the chalkboard
  • chalkboard paint
  • paint for the outer frame
  • liquid nails- to secure your frames
  • hot glue gun- to secure your wine corks
  • picture frame wire/screws, or Dischangers or 3M velcro for hanging
Tutorial:
1) Cut  trim pieces for the frame.
2) Assemble boards on piece of MDF and secure with liquid nails.
3) Clamp and let dry.
 
4) Paint outside frame and MDF and picture frame.
5) Paint an inner area the same size of the inside of the picture frame with chalkboard paint according to instructions. Let dry.
6) Attach picture frame (framing the chalkboard painted area) with wood glue.
 
7) Pre-arrange and secure wine corks using hot glue.
8) Attach picture frame wire/screws, Dischangers or 3M velcro to hang.
9) HANG!
 
Her finished project looks like something I’d Pin from a Pottery Barn catalog. Awesome job, Laura!
 
See more DIY, decorating and Laura’s beautiful home tour at





What’s all the HOOPla? DIY Hoop Art Tutorial

My friend Amanda from

Mommy is Coocoo

created  a wall of beautiful art using embroidery hoops and pretty fabrics. Super easy and affordable do-it-yourself to fill up an empty wall space. So many options for making a design for a custom color palette and space.

Materials:

  • Fabric fabric scraps
  • Embroidery Hoops embroidery hoops

Tutorial:

  • Simply stretch fabric in embroidery hoops, trim to size and hang. Amanda recommends not putting a whole lot of thought into it. Sometimes a random surprise is the best plan.  fabric hoop art tutorial

Wall before:{naked!}

bare wall

Wall after:

hoop art tutorial

Fun, colorful, affordable, super quick and easy wall art that makes a big beautiful statement!

hoop and fabric wall art

embroidery hoop wall art

See more creative DIY (and more!) from Amanda at Mommy is CooCoo!

 



DIY Drawer Shelves

Creative budget friendly ideas like these side table drawers turned wall shelves are such an inspiration. Beautiful, practical and so fun! DIY friends, I’d like to introduce you to Katie, lifestyle blogger at

Shades of Grey blog

and I’m honored to ‘show off’ her latest creative do-it-yourself project:

Katie was working with a limited budget of less than $20. She  wanted shelving and wanted it to be something you don’t see everyday. This is her creative solution…

DIY wall shelves