DIY Cart Rescue/Furniture Makeover

This is a Sponsored post written by me on behalf of Elmer’s ProBond Advanced for SocialSpark. All opinions are 100% mine.

Do you have old furniture just taking up space in the basement, garage or attic? Or maybe with the start of yard sale season right around the corner, you’ll spy a fun furniture piece to flip…keep your eyes open! The other day I spied an old metal cart collecting dust so I decided to give it a purpose. It once belonged to my husband’s grandfather. Time to dust the cart off, give it life and make it useful.

cart makeover at diyshowoff.com

Materials:

  • Old metal cart
  • Pine planks (I purchased three 1x3s and one 1×4)
  • Wood stain and sealer
  • ProBond Advanced

What I did:

First I cleaned up the cart a bit. I was going to spray paint it but it really wasn’t in bad shape (finish wasn’t original – it had been spray painted in the past) and I sort of like the few scratches and scuffs, making it look old and not brand new. Sometimes imperfections are perfect, right?

before…

cart before

cart before

Then I set about measuring and cutting the wood planks to fit the top and what looks like support for a bottom shelf. 

measuring

After deciding placement of the planks, I marked, sanded and cleaned each one. 

I stained each wood plank a rich beautful color. I brushed the stain onto all sides with a foam brush (in the same direction as the wood grain) and wiped away with a clean rag then let them dry for an hour or two.

Last step! Just glue and clamp the wood planks into place. Elmer’s ProBond Advanced is designed for gluing mixed materials like wood planks to the metal cart (porous to non-porous materials) without expanding, creating a foamy residue and making a mess. Awesome! Let the glue dry 24 hours. 

I applied a sealer to the wood to protect the finish and add a little shine.

Loved once again…

flea market flip at diyshowoff.com

Beautiful new wood top and shelf:

wood plank cart makeover at diyshowoff.com

Now what was once just junk now serves as a side table (or would that be center table?) in our family room.

diy furniture makeover at diyshowoff.com

Are you a DIY’er? Find any recent ‘hidden treasure’? Find more DIY inspiration on Elmer’s Mixed Materials Pinterest board. 

 

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DIY Window Shelves for Plants

I recently shared my craft room tour. And as a little reward for cleaning up that chaos and getting organized, I treated myself to a little DIY project. I love one of the windows in this room. Here’s how it looked in the past:

vintage craft room

The window shown above nearly reaches from floor to ceiling and with the two different sized windows in the room (one tall window with trim original to the house/one high small window with no trim), window treatments always felt tricky or lopsided. 

So why cover that beautiful trimmed tall window at all? It faces the back of the house, it’s a second story window and it’s not a room for dressing or a need for privacy. I’ve always wanted to put shelves on a window for plants. Plenty of sunshine should assist in changing my luck with plants, right? 

Here’s what I did…

Materials:

  • (3) 1 x 4″ pine boards for shelves
  • (6) shelf brackets
  • Minwax Polyshades (Ebony)

I decided where I would attach the brackets to the window trim to calculate the measurement of my shelves.

measure

Then cut my shelves. 

window shelving tutorial

Sanded the rough edges and wiped them clean. 

window shelving tutorial

Then brushed on the Polyshades using a foam brush. I let it sit for a few minutes then wiped the stain away and let dry. I did all sides. (I may apply a wax finish to the wood shelves for further water-proofing but I was on a bit of a deadline.)

window shelving tutorial

Next I marked the holes for the brackets and drilled a pilot hole.

window shelving tutorial

Then I just screwed the brackets into the window trim/pilot hole (can always be patched with wood filler in the future). *Use a level to be sure they’re ‘level’. 

window shelving tutorial

Attach the wood shelves to the brackets with screws (be sure these screws are smaller than the shelf thickness so the screw doesn’t poke up from the bottom).  

It adds a bit of privacy without a long drapy curtain panel but still lets natural light into the room.  

window plant shelves at diyshowoff.com

It’ll take some maneuvering/removing plants to open the window but the shelves don’t interfere with the function. 

window shelves at diyshowoff.com window succulents

 

before

vintage craft room

after

Craft Room at diyshowoff.com

 

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Baseboard Trim

Yesterday I shared how I installed grouted vinyl floor tiles in the bathroom and today I just wanted to share a little baseboard trim tip. I re-used existing baseboard trim because it’s the old wide original trim in good shape. See how to easily swap out your baseboards here and a little tip for easy decorative trim detail here.  

grouted vinyl floor tile tutorial @diyshowoff

I gave it a good scrubbing and a little scuffing with sandpaper.

Then reattached the baseboard trim using my nail gun and brads. Countersink the nails, fill with wood filler and sand. 

Next I sealed all of the seams with caulk – where the trim meets the wall and where the shoe moulding rests against the baseboard. I use DAP paintable caulk for windows/doors/trim.

FrogTape® Mult-Surface tape applied to the wall ensures a nice straight line without caulk smears. Apply the tape horizontally above the baseboard onto the wall. Use your thumbnail or a credit card to activate the PaintBlock® Technology.

DIY caulking baseboard trim

Cut the tip of the caulk tube at an angle (the larger the hole, the bigger amount of caulk-age, so I prefer to keep the cut on the small side. Holding the caulk gun at an angle so that the flat end of the cut hole faces the seam where the baseboard meets the wall, run a bead of caulk. 

caulking baseboard trim tutorial

I fill my FrogTape container with a little bit of water. With a wet finger, smooth the caulk. I work from left to right and since this is a small space, I worked in an entire section (about 4-5 ft. at most). You’ll have a lot of excess (remember to have those paper towels handy). 

caulking baseboard trim tutorial

Then peel away the FrogTape starting at a bottom edge and pulling up and away from the caulk. 

caulking baseboard trim tutorial

Nice clean line! Repeat until all top baseboard seams are sealed. 

Now repeat the caulking steps (without the painter’s tape) where the shoe moulding rests agains the baseboards. Once dry (about 30 minutes), it’s time to paint!

Paint is Dutch Boy’s Cabinet and Trim paint. I used FrogTape where the shoe moulding meets the floor to prevent getting paint on my nice new grouted vinyl tiles. Using my thumbnail, I again activated the Paintblock Technology, then painted my trim. After the second coat of paint, I removed the FrogTape while the paint was still wet. 

painting baseboard trim

The vanity: I could have cut the baseboard trim so that the vanity sat flush against the wall but since the countertop had a little play (it sat out from the vanity about an inch), I attached scrap (stained) 1x4s cut to size to the back of the vanity, so that it would hide the gap and rest above my baseboard. (Also…one of my baseboards was good and glued as well as nailed to the plaster wall…I feared created a bigger more involved mess with pulling it off.) Now my countertop rests against the wall and is flush with the front of the vanity with no overhang but I don’t believe there’s a law or rule that says the countertop must protrude from the vanity. Is there? It also gave me a little more wiggle room for the tight fit plumbing. 

bathroom vanity and trim fix

Good as new! I love fresh, clean, white baseboards.

DIYShowOff bathroom accessories

 

I used my FrogTape along the door frame and window trim too. 

bathroom makeover after

 

If you missed it, you can see the complete before and after bathroom makeover here

FrogTape Blog Squad

Disclaimer: I received compensation to complete this project for using FrogTape® products. All opinions, projects and ideas are based on my own experience.

DIY Grouted Vinyl Floor Tiles

I recently shared the transformation of our upstairs main bathroom. I’m so in love with the complete change, especially the floor.

It looks so much like marble tiles, doesn’t it? But those are vinyl floor tiles with vinyl tile grout. The look without the cost or maintenance and shorter installation time. 

grouted vinyl floor tiles - diyshowoff bathroom makeover

Why I chose to go with grouted vinyl floor tiles? Because it’s a temporary solution for us (temporary as in 4-5 years or maybe even a little longer). It’s not for everyone but down the road I have plans on replacing the old tub and shower surround with a slipper tub/shower and at that time, I do plan on using real tile on the floor, under the tub and on the shower walls so in the interim, grouted vinyl tiles were a budget friendly and easy DIY solution that I plan on enjoying every day. The best part? I was able to truly do-it-myself and installation only took one day. It looks professionally done and real! You’ll see mixed reviews and negative comments when researching but I couldn’t be happier and love it!

Materials:

Supplies:

  • box cutter/utility knife
  • rolling pin
  • bucket with water
  • sponge
  • rag
  • float
  • putty knife

What I did:

The old vanity and toilet were removed. For us it’s because we were replacing those anyway. I recommend at least removing the toilet to get underneath. We also removed the shoe moulding/quarter round trim from around the room. I then removed the old vinyl flooring. I did cheat a little on this part. I hired my nephew to help me scrape off the old vinyl floor paper backing that was glued to the subfloor. That was the most labor intensive part. (Note: I removed the old vinyl flooring because it was peeling up around the perimeter of the room. If it had been secure, level and in good shape, I would have placed my vinyl tiles over it.)

removing vinyl flooring

Start with a smooth, clean, level, dry surface. Since this space was prepped for vinyl previously, the subfloor seams were sealed and it was level. Once all of the glued paper was removed and the floor cleaned, I simply started placing my vinyl tiles. I started with laying the full (un-cut tiles), using a staggered pattern. Since such a small amount of the tile is actually visible in this small space after placement of the vanity and toilet, I started with the first full tile placement at the doorway and worked my way back into the room. I made sure to pay attention to “marble veining” so that the pattern all ran the same direction. 

installing a vinyl tile floor tutorial

Simply peel away the paper backing (these things were super tacky!) and place the tile onto the subfloor. I used 3/16 inch spacers between the tiles. I marked my tiles 6 inches in on the edge of each tile with a pencil to assist in laying a straight design.

vinyl floor tiles

Having a supervisor on hand keeps you focused as well as replacing the spacers repeatedly.

Once all of the full un-cut vinyl tiles were in place, I moved onto what I thought was going to be the difficult part. Cutting the tile was way WAY easier than I anticipated. I simply used a utility knife blade to ‘score’ the cut line then snapped the tile. That simple. I didn’t have to apply a lot of pressure or go over it repeatedly with the utility knife.

grouted vinyl floor tile tutorial @diyshowoff

There were a couple of tricky cuts around the door frame, heat register and toilet so having a little more tile than needed came in handy. 

grouted vinyl floor tile tutorial @diyshowoff

Finish. Stand up and admire your tile. No cuts with a wet saw but you’ll be so proud of how good it’s looking! 

Looking good! Ready for vinyl tile grout!

grouted vinyl floor tile tutorial @diyshowoff

I removed the spacers and rolled over the vinyl tiles with a rolling pin to make sure each tile was secure and in place. Then?! The best part – no waiting for mortar to set…move straight to grouting!

grouted vinyl floor tile tutorial @diyshowoff

Have a bucket with water on hand (replace dirty water frequently with clean water) and work in small sections from the back wall working backwards towards the door. I worked in 2ft. sections because the grout dried fast. I used a putty knife to apply the grout to the float. Then used the float to “smoosh” the grout into the joints between the tiles. Sometimes I found just using the putty knife or my finger worked in some areas. I wiped away the excess grout with a wet sponge (squeeze out all of the water) then followed cleaning up the water/grout with a wrung-out wet rag where needed before moving onto the next section. I cleaned away all of the extra grout and wiped up water as I went along. 

grouted vinyl floor tile tutorial @diyshowoff

Let dry 24 hours before light use. I also went over the floor with a wet rag after 24 hours. We replaced the toilet and vanity and re-attached the baseboard/trim after about 48 hours.

grouted vinyl floor tile tutorial @diyshowoff

That’s it! I am thrilled with the result! 

grouted vinyl floor tile tutorial @diyshowoff

I’ve had questions about how this has held up. In the one month that it’s been done, it’s holding up just as well as it looked the first day but I can’t say about long term yet. There is plenty of leftover grout. I made sure my container has a good seal and will keep it on hand just in case repairs are needed. This bathroom is being used daily and so far so good! I’ll check back in with a review in a few months to let you know if anything has changed. 

See the complete before and after bathroom makeover here

Disclaimer: This post describes my first time experience, what I did and what worked for me. Results may vary. 

How Wonderful Life is While You’re in the World – DIY sign tutorial

I think this lyric to “Your Song” by Elton John is the perfect accessory to the world map in our family room.  DIY sign

Materials:

  • Adhesive Vinyl – Happy Crafters
  • Transfer Paper
  • Scrap Wood Plank
  • Acrylic Craft Paint

Tools: Silhouette Cameo, scissors, gift card/credit card (for burnishing/rubbing), foam paint brush

Tutorial:

Paint scrap wood plank. Mine is is a 1×3 about 46 inches in length. Let dry. 

Using the Silhouette Studio software, I created my design utilizing “felt marker” font.  Silhouette design studio

Load the vinyl into the Silhouette Cameo vinyl side up and ‘send to cut’. Be sure to adjust the settings for vinyl. 

There are two ways to use vinyl as a stencil. If painting the letters, weed away the letters to create a stencil. I wanted to paint my sign (not the lettering), so I removed all of the negative part of the design, leaving the vinyl letters (like stickers). DIY sign tutorial

Apply transfer paper, sticky side down directly to the vinyl decal. Transfer paper ensures that everything is lined up properly when ‘transferring’. You could apply the vinyl in the same way you’d apply stickers, but keeping a straight line is a challenge!

Rub the transfer paper with a credit card or gift card to ‘transfer’ the vinyl to the transfer paper. Remove the wax paper backing.

Place vinyl (sticky side down) onto the wood plank. 

Rub with a gift card. 

Remove transfer paper (it may be a little tricky…I peel it away slowing, almost creating a crease in the transfer paper to get the vinyl decal to stick to the painted wood. 

Make sure all letters are nice and stuck. 

Paint the sign. I did a light coat using a sort of dry brush (foam brush) technique for a worn look. DIY wood plank sign tutorial

Before paint dries, carefully remove vinyl lettering.

Optional: sand and/or glaze for an antiqued, distressed look. Seal. Hang using picture hanging hardware or Command velcro strips. 

Perfect for a little Valentine sentiment, too. What song lyric would your sign display? How wonderful life is while your in the world. DIY Sign Tutorial

 

*This post is sponsored by Happy Crafters. Tutorial, experience and opinion is my own.  I really love working with this vinyl. Check out all the supplies at Happy Crafters for inspiration for your next project. 

HClogopngsmall

 

Tips for Making a DIY Industrial Pipe Shelving Unit

I recently shared the open pantry before and after reveal and the star of that DIY ‘show off’ is definitely the industrial pipe shelving… Industrial Pipe Shelving  As a part of the January Creative Storage challenge for the Lowe’s Creative Ideas team, today I’m sharing a tutorial on what we did to use as tips for creating your own.

THIS IS LONG and sounds confusing BUT if you’re making one of your own, I think being detailed will help make the plan, design and build easier along with other tutorials and tips you may come across in your search for how to make DIY industrial pipe shelving. 

Getting started: The most difficult step (and not really that difficult when sketching a visual to help ‘build’ the correct size) will be your measurements and design. I’m no architect or artist, so my sketch is rough without fancy drafting software but it gets the job done and I was able to see where I needed to make adjustments. Start with measuring the space where the shelving will go. Length, height and width. I just drew the shelving (not to scale) on a piece of paper and labelled the measurements. Keep in mind that stock pipe comes in 12″, 18″ and 24″ pieces…any other size pipe will need to be custom cut/threaded (done by a Lowe’s associate). industrial pipe shelving plans

Understanding the construction: For 6 foot wide shelving, I wanted three supports for each shelf. Not enough support and the wood shelves may sag with weight over time. DIY pipe shelf construction  The pipe shelving frame is only connected horizontally by the wood shelving. Mine is only attached at the wall near the ceiling. I didn’t notice until assembling that my pipe cutting order was missing a piece so there should actually be another wall flange/pipe in the center top (and will be once I have more pipe cut). You could also screw it into the floor but we did not. It sounds as if it would be unsteady. Mr. DIY even had plans to add brackets for extra strength, however when installation was complete, even he was surprised by the how sturdy it is.

Each of the three built up/connected vertical pipe supports are individual and not connected to each other in any way. (Labeled on the left in the photo above as an example.)

Each wood shelf has three holes on the outer front edge (one on the left, one in the center, one in the right). Each shelf front is supported by resting on top of a tee in the front, threaded through a hole in the shelf with the vertical pipe. On the back, each wood shelf rests on an up-turned elbow. So each wood shelf is not anchored or screwed down in any way. It’s simply locked into place by the front pipe pieces through the holes in the shelf. Each shelf rests on a three tees in the front and three elbows in the back. 

My (vertical) measurements are rough but I knew that I had a 107 inch cap (the height from floor to ceiling) and could not go higher. Adding the measurements visually helps with adding up the numbers. I estimated my fittings (the flanges, tees and elbows to be 2 inches – they’re actually smaller but it gave me wiggle room in my design so I knew my shelving would not be higher than 107″ and coming in a few inches lower is ideal). The wood shelving thickness does not come into play because it doesn’t add to the height of the unit. On my drawing, starting with the bottom of the shelving unit, I drew in the flanges and the number 2 for 2″. Then, because of heat vent placement, I knew my first shelf needed to be above that. I drew in the 24″ pipes. Then a tee (2 inches), then my next pipe length 12″, another tee (2 inches), 15″ pipe to accommodate our microwave height, another tee (2 inches), another 15″ pipe, another 2″ tee, a 12″ pipe, a 15″ pipe, 2″ elbow. Adding those up, my rough shelving unit height measured at 107. Exact in theory, but due to the varying heights of flanges, tees, elbows and pipe threads when assembling, actual finished shelving unit height came in at 102.5″ (so, overestimating measurements in the plan ensures that shelving unit will not be too tall for the space).

Horizontal: My wood shelves are 20″ deep. As shown in the photo above, in the front the shelving rests on 3-way tees, in the back, it rests on an upturned 90 degree elbow. I chose 16″ pipes for connecting the horizontal 3-way tee to the upturned elbow. (Because the tee sits 1″ in on the 20″ shelf, measures 2″, then 16″ pipe, then a 1″ elbow totaling 20 inches, meaning once threaded it won’t touch/rub/scratch the wall. Keep the total horizontal support measurement shorter than the shelf depth.) For my top three horizontal frame supports (only 2 shown in photos for now), I added an inch (17″) to reach threading the wall/flange.

Horizontal pipe pieces:

  • 3 for each shelf (15 total for 5 shelves)
  • 3 for top of industrial pipe shelving frame 

Note: You may want to adjust pipe lengths to fit your own design. Maybe all one size or staggered shelving or a desk area. But once you understand the construction, you can customize each shelf’s height to fit your space. I used black iron pipe because the cost was a bit lower. Galvanized or maybe even PVC would work as well. All of my pipes and fittings are 1/2 inch. A Lowe’s associate made cuts and threads on pipes that were not an ‘in stock’ size. 

Shop: Make a list of plumbing supplies by counting up each tee, pipe, elbow and flange in your sketch.

Materials for a pipe shelving unit measuring 72 inches wide x approx. 102.5 inches tall x 20 inches deep. 

DIY pipe shelving plumbing materials

  • (6) flanges (be sure to get the correct fitting size for 1/2 pipe)
  • (18) 90 degree elbows (be sure to get the correct fitting size for 1/2 pipe)
  • (15) 3-way tees (be sure to get the correct fitting size for 1/2 pipe)
  • (3) 24″ pipes 
  • (3) 17″ pipes (custom cut/thread)
  • (15) 16″ pipes (custom cut/thread)
  • (9) 15″ pipes (custom cut/thread)
  • (6) 12″ pipes
  • screws and walls anchors
  • 7/8″ hole saw bit (perfect circle cut for 15 holes)

What we did:

Prep: First step will be to clean the pipes. Because oil is needed for the cutting process, they will be filthy, dripping with oil and there are likely going to be pieces of pipe that have that annoying super tacky glued price stickers protected by packaging tape that will need removed. Since I used iron pipe, I could not let the pipes soak in soapy water (they’d rust), so I used grease-fighting Lysol wipes, paper towels and lots of patience.

Paint: Next I spray painted all of the plumbing pieces Oil Rubbed Bronze. I did not use primer. Because I chose black iron instead of galvanized, scratches or poor coverage aren’t an issue.   spray painting pipes

Wood shelves: We cut 1 inch off of our 72 inch length so we’d be able to open the half bathroom door the entire way. This doesn’t affect anything. Decide where you want the holes (for the pipe supports) to be placed. I decided about 1 inch in from the front, 2 inches in from the sides. I created a template from a piece of cardboard. It looks like this: industrial pipe shelves tutorial

I simply lined up the edges of the cardboard with the left front edge of the wood shelf and marked my circle/cut mark with a pencil. Flip the cardboard and do the same for the right front edge. I measured the center of my 71″ length and pencilled in the circle/cut mark, lining it up with my template/stencil. I did this with each wood shelf. 

Cutting/drilling the holes: We drilled a tiny hole into the center of each penciled circle (made lining up the hole saw easier). We used the 7/8″ hole saw bit for perfect clean drilled holes. It made creating 15 holes all the same size a breeze! I lightly sanded and cleaned around the holes and our cut edge.

hole saw bit for pipe shelving pipe shelving tutorial

Because we have exterior wiring/conduit going up the wall behind the shelving, we had to create a notch on each wood shelf. We used our Dremel Multi-Max to to this.  pipe shelving

Staining and sealing each side of each wood shelf is the most time consuming part of the project. I love that Rust-Oleum’s Ultimate Wood Stain dries in about an hour. I only applied one coat…isn’t the color pretty? I did one side then flipped and did the other (the edges and inside of the holes too), applying with a foam brush and wiping off (rubber gloves and lots of rags are a must!). Watch for drips! Then I applied 5 coats of polyurethane to the top side (after this much work, you’re going to want to protect the finish on these shelves!), allowing to dry 2 hours between each coat. Again, watch for drips! No sanding between coats required. Once the one side was dry, I flipped the shelves and repeated brushing two coats to the bottom side, drying between each one.  staining wood shelves

Time for assembly! I was super nervous about this part. The size of the room did not allow for us to connect and lift the shelving into place. So we propped up the first shelf using a hamper and books and assembled in place. industrial pipe shelving assembly I can’t believe how easily and smoothly assembly went. I started by attaching flanges to the first three pipes. Then added a tee to each one. The tee should be placed in a direction with one opening facing up, another opening facing horizontal towards the wall. Next, attach a length of pipe (mine are the 17″ ones) to the horizontal facing tee. Attach an elbow at the end of the horizontal pipe. You’ll want the elbow to face up for supporting the wood shelf. assembling pipe shelving  Hold that piece into place under the hole in the wood shelf. Thread the next length of pipe vertically (So starting order at the floor is flange, pipe, tee, wood shelf then next length of pipe). Continue building the shelf in this way. We kept the bar stools and books for support until the very end of the assembly process and securing the shelving to the wall. 

Work with a level on the wood shelving to ensure everything is square and level. (Adjust threading as needed.)

The top: securing the shelving unit. After the last shelf is in place, add the last three vertical lengths of pipe. Add an elbow to each one. Add a flange to each horizontal pipe piece and thread into the elbow. The flange should be touching the wall (threads will allow for adjusting). 

Using a pencil, mark the wall where screws (into the flange) need to go. Our walls are plaster so we drilled pilot holes and added heavy duty wall anchors. If you designed your shelf to line up with the wall studs…you’re good to go.  Screw flanges into place. securing pipe shelving to wall  Sturdy. Beautiful! Ready to be stocked and decorated.  industrial pipe shelving tutorial at DIYShowOff.com My cut pipe Lowe’s order was missing one of my top custom cut pipes so our shelving unit is only secured into the wall by the two outer pipe configurations and it’s still sturdy! But I do plan to add the top center piece to finish/secure it properly. Industrial Pipe Shelving Closing thoughts: Whew! That sounds way too complicated and long, but I promise…I only wanted to include as many details as I could for your research into making your own.  I was so happy that it was easier than I anticipated. The hardest part – the design and again, by drawing it out one piece at a time, even that isn’t so complicated. Trust me, math is not one of my strengths. The most time consuming part – the staining/sealing or maybe it was removing the sticker goo. But the reward? A gorgeous custom shelving unit way better than any manufactured piece. Wouldn’t you agree?farmhouse pantry

DIY pipe shelving at DIYShowOff

See the entire pantry before & after reveal here.

More DIY ideas at Lowe’s Creative Ideas, follow Lowe’s on InstagramPinterest and sign up for the Creative Ideas magazine and app!   LCI

*Disclaimer: As a member of the Lowe’s Creative Ideas Creators and Influencers network, I received a Lowe’s gift card to complete this challenge. As always, all ideas and opinions are in my own words. The blog post above is what worked for me. Results may vary. Remember to work in a well-ventilated area and to take the proper safety precautions.

Links to more industrial pipe shelving:

Brick House pipe shelving

Have any questions? Let me know in the comments! Good luck!

Sharing at Home Stories A to Z

Fall Chevron DIY

Earlier this week, I shared my fall home tour. Did you happen to see the DIY chevron “Fall in Love” plaque on the mantel in my family room?

colorful fall mantel

Tutorial:

DIY Fall chevron Art

Materials:

  • Scrap wood
  • FrogTape® Chevron Shape Tape
  • Paint (I used glossy Krylon cherry red spray paint, turquoise DecoArt Americana Desert Turquoise acrylic craft paint and a gold spray paint)
  • Fall stencil (I created/cut a fall vinyl stencil using my Silhouette. Leaf damask design from Silhouette America online store.)
  • Martha Stewart Crafts Wood Stain 

Here’s what I did:

1. I sanded the edges of my scrap wood (left over from a shelf DIY).

2. I spray painted my wood plaque red and let dry for about an hour. 

DIY Fall Art

3. Starting at the top of my plaque, I applied the FrogTape® Chevron Shape Tape. Cut to size, remove half of the wax paper backing, place Shape Tape, remove other half of the wax paper backing and smooth into place. 

DIY Fall Art

4. and just kept adding rows by placing the zig zag design exactly as my first piece and just eye-balling the distance. To get a chevron pattern, line up the zig zag.

5. Using my thumbnail, I made sure the edges of the Shape Tape were secure. 

6. Then painted my chevron using turquoise craft paint. I did three coats to completely cover the red paint underneath. 

DIY Fall Art

Tip: Elevate the wood using the tape container to paint sides.

DIY Fall Art

7. I peeled away the Shape Tape after the third coat of craft paint while the paint was still wet and let it dry. 

DIY Fall Art

8. Once dry, I sanded the the entire plaque for a bit of distressing.

DIY Fall chevron Art

9. Then brushed on the wood stain, let it sit for a few minutes then wiped it off for an aged look.

DIY Fall chevron Art

10. Once everything was dry, I applied my vinyl stencil and taped the edges of my wood plaque with FrogTape® Multi-surface.

11. Then spray painted the design using gold spray paint. 

12. Remove tape and vinyl stencil.

DIY Fall chevron Art

It perfectly coordinates with my red/aqua fall mantel display…

DIY Fall chevron Art

red gold turquoise fall mantel  

Sharing at the Fall Mantel PartyFall Nesting Party and Home Stories A to Z

FrogTape Blog Squad*This is sponsored by FrogTape®. FrogTape provided by Shurtech. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience. 

Decorating a Lamp Shade with Vinyl

Lamp Makeover

Plain white lamp shades are the perfect clean slate for adding a little DIY color and pattern to a room. I used vinyl on the inside of my shade to make it a little more special. When the lamp is turned off, the design is subtle, almost invisible but when the lamp is turned on, there’s a sweet little reminder to “shine bright”.

vinyl lampshade tutorial

Materials I used:

lamp shade and vinyl

  • old lamp
  • FrogTape® Multi-surface
  • spray paint (Valspar Indigo)
  • Ikea Jonsbo lamp shade
  • Glossy adhesive vinyl (turquoise) from Happy Crafters
  • optional: elastic gemstone bracelet

Tools: Silhouette Cameo

How I did it:

After taping off the light socket and cord using FrogTape®, I spray painted my old lamp a pretty navy and let it dry. Then simply removed the FrogTape to reveal a nice clean cord and nice clean switch and socket. 

spray painting lamp

For the vinyl wording: I created my lettering in the Silhouette Design Studio. Be sure to right click the text when finished and “flip horizontally” so it shows backwards. IMPORTANT: MIRROR IMAGE the TEXT!

mirror image text

I also used a flower garland shape for my design in addition to “shine bright”. 

vinyl flower design

I sent both to my Silhouette Cameo to “cut” once I adjusted my settings for vinyl. If you don’t have a vinyl cutter, you could also use vinyl decals if the design looks the same backwards (remember: text must be flipped horizontal/mirror image for this project).

Silhouette Cameo tutorial

I then removed all of the unnecessary vinyl from my designs by weeding away the vinyl that isn’t a part of the design…

vinyl lettering and design

and added the transfer paper. 

Happy Crafters vinyl

I removed the waxpaper backing and placed my designs on the inside of the lamp shade. I used a credit card to rub down the design for transferring. Then I removed the transfer paper. 

applying vinyl to lampshade

Note: I found cutting and adding my flower design in sections of two to be the best way with the rounded/tapered lamp shade. Keep vinyl pieces individual/smaller sized to go around the curved lampshade to prevent wrinkling when applying. 

applying vinyl to plastic lamp shade

I added the turquoise bracelet for a little additional bling. 

accessorizing lamp

Here’s a shot of the inside and outside. I do love how the turquoise vinyl lettering on the inside shows navy-ish on the outside. I couldn’t have planned that better if I tried!

inside outside of lampshade

It’s perfect on a side table in our family room for a little extra reading light…

lamp makeover

lamp makeover

Lamp off… 

lamp makeover

 Lamp on…

lampshade makeover

 

NEAT! Love it! I also thought “Note to self: Relax.”, a monogram or a damask pattern would have been pretty. What would your lamp shade say?

FrogTape Blog Squad*This is sponsored by FrogTape®. FrogTape provided by Shurtech. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience. 

Happy Crafters supplied the vinyl for this sponsored blog post.

  HClogopngsmall

Framed Pet Silhouettes

I love silhouette shapes, don’t you? In need of some sort of framed art in our hallway, I decided to whip up some silhouettes of my pets to frame.

Framed Pet Silhouettes on Burlap

We have two pets in our home…Lalka, our ragdoll cat:

lalka.ps2

CocoRosie, our Italian greyhound:

rosie italian greyhound

Actual pictures of them are something I haven’t framed but black silhouettes on burlap are just about as sweet!

how to make a framed pet silhouette

Materials I used:

  • Two 8×10 picture frames
  • Burlap
  • Silhouette textured adhesive cardstock from Happy Crafters

What I did:

1. I cut out two 8×10 pieces of burlap (and ironed them using my irons highest setting and spritzing the burlap with water (not steam) on both sides).

burlap craft

2. Using my Silhouette designer studio software, I purchased a cat and greyhound silhouette from the Silhouette store and created two designs for cutting, one of an 8 x 10 matte for my white adhesive card stock and a dog and cat measured to fit inside of the matte on black adhesive card stock. I also saved my designs to cut out more adhesive cat and dog shapes for making handmade cards (using the adhesive card stock is like making your own custom stickers and adhesive labels).

pet silhouettes

matte

3. Then adjusted the settings according to the “adhesive card stock” option and sent to the Silhouette for cutting. 

cutting pet silhouettes

4.  Then simply peeled away my designs and placed them on the burlap. Easy peasy! I like that the adhesive keeps my designs in place on the burlap. 

adhesive cardstock

Italian greyhound silhouette

5. Then framed and hung them up on the wall. 

framed burlap adhesive cardstock pet silhouette tutorial

So cute!

Do you have pet art in your home? I love whimsical pet silhouettes. Remember my Italian Greyhound t-shirt?

DIY chevron greyhound applique

Who knows what I’ll embellish next! I don’t have a pet accented throw pillow yet. It might be next on the list. :) 

HClogopngsmall

This post was sponsored. Happy Crafters provided the adhesive card stock. As always, opinion, experience and tutorial are my own. :) 

Chandelier Planter Tutorial

About a month ago, we hosted a Mother’s Day BBQ for our family – filled with good food, a fun gardening project and great times…stuff special family memories are made of.

DIYShowOff chandelier planter

I started the prep work in advance, so that the fun part of planting flowers was the only concern on the part of my guests.

How to Make a Chandelier Planter

how-to-make-a chandelier-flower-planter

Materials:

  • Chandelier (try Craigs List, Ebay, thrift stores, yard sales)
  • Terra cotta pots and saucers (The same number as the “arms” of your chandelier. Ours all had 5.) Plastic pots would also work. Get creative! Try your own spin!
  • Outdoor-rated spray paint
  • Waterproof glue: Elmer’s Probond is perfect for gluing porous (pots) to metal (chandelier)
  • Plumber’s epoxy putty – I used this to help create an elevation for draining (optional)
  • Flowers, plants
  • Moisture Control Potting Mix
  • “S” hook for hanging (and the chain that comes with the chandelier if needed)

Tools:

  • Wire cutters
  • Garden trowel

1. Slide off the plastic ‘candle’ holders and remove all electrical/wiring from the chandelier using the wire cutters.

removing-wiring

2. Attach terra cotta saucers using epoxy putty and glue. The epoxy putty helped to keep the things in place since clamping isn’t possible as well as raise the pot a bit for draining.

chandelier-planter-tutorial

Repeat for attaching the pots. I let the glue dry 1-2 hours before spray painting and allowed it to cure several days before planting.

how-to-make-a-chandelier-planter

3. Spray paint the entire thing (even your chain if you’ll be using it). I found that hanging the chandelier from a low tree branch to be the easiest spray painting process (especially if the chandelier’s shape doesn’t sit level) but you could also do a 2-step process (position upside down on drop cloth/cardboard, spray paint, dry, flip and the spray from top and let dry). Some parts of the chandelier’s design may also be removable (simply unscrew) and can be taken apart for spray painting if needed. Wear a mask if you’re working under poorly ventilated conditions or breezy weather and eye protection.

spray-painting-chandelier

4. Dry. Since I worked in advance, the chandeliers had several days to dry/cure. The glue did expand and become visible. And a little scratching of the paint happened in places as well. But as we say around here, “imperfection adds character” and those things are not something you pick out and focus on when the project is complete (any imperfections stand out in the  completed project below?… nope!) You could lightly sand and spray a base primer on your chandelier as well.

drying-chandeliers

5. Plant! We had several color coordinated flower options on hand as well as some ivy and used Miracle-Gro Moisture Control Potting Soil – perfect for container gardens. I set up the ‘planting station’ on our barn patio to escape the windy conditions.

planting-chandelier-planter

Even the little ones had fun planting flowers for mom in little watering cans from the dollar store…

miracle-gro-moisture-control-potting-mix

addy-planting

planting-flowers

6. Water according to plant instructions. NOTE: The Miracle-Gro Moisture Control Potting Mix protects against over & under watering. Virtually fool-proof if you do not possess a green thumb.

7. Hang! Ta-da…

aqua-chandelier-planter

pink-chandelier-planter

navy-chandelier

mint-chandelier-planter

orange-chandelier-planter

Note: My chandelier planter is hanging from a plant hook on our patio. Sunlight and watering are not an issue. The design of some of the chandeliers posted above also allow for table top display. I only ‘display’ my chandelier planter like a ‘chandelier’ on our covered patio as party decorating (a few hours then back to the hook). Also, drainage is limited due to the glue however, I water daily and the Miracle Gro Moisture Control Potting Soil contributes to a healthy balance.

DIYShowOff chandelier planter

You may have spied my chandelier planter used indoors at our Summer Home Tour too…

chandelier planter

and hanging in the tree as a photo prop for the easy shaded DIY DOG BED

diy-dog-bed-tutorial

For more planting tips and inspiration:

  • Visit Miracle-Gro online to access their expansive library of articles and videos full of expert gardening tips for beginners and professionals alike as well as online tools to help growers solve common garden problems and find the right products to to maintain a healthy and beautiful garden.
  • This is a Sponsored post written by me on behalf of Miracle-Gro for SocialSpark. All opinions are 100% mine. See the planning and source to my inspiration here

Free Standing Pallet Herb Garden

Our vegetable garden is located a few acres from the house. Wanting to have a small herb garden closer to the patio, grill and kitchen and inspired by so many vertical pallet planters (thanks, Amanda!), Mr. DIY and I created a free standing (moveable) vertical pallet herb garden.

free-standing-vertical-pallet-herb-garden

 Here is what we did:

Materials: (if referring to our tutorial for your own project, completely read through what we did as I recommend some changes to our experience)

  • Kiln-dried pallet in good shape
  • Scrap 1×4 wood
  • Scrap block 4×4 wood
  • Scrap 2×4 wood
  • Nails
  • Wheel and hardware/screws to attach
  • Wood stain
  • Protective clear coat
  • Staples
  • Fabric weed barrier
  • Potting soil
  • Herbs

1. We have plenty of pallets stacked around here and chose a kiln-dried one, marked with “HT” (heat-treated and less likely chemically treated) and gave it a good scrubbing with bleach as well.

2. We removed a three of the horizontal boards from one side with a pry bar to create a larger space for working and tall growing herbs.

pallet 3. Then sanded down the splinters, rough edges and hammered down all of the nails.

4. We added a piece of scrap wood to the bottom of one side (1×4) to create a ‘shelf” type surface to attach a caster/wheel. Inserting the 1×4 took some playing around (prying up one of the pallet boards to squeeze it into place.

vertical pallet garden

5. The other side of the bottom got a 4×4 block (double check for leveling with the wheel side) and a miter-cut scrap 2×4 for support. (If I had to do over, I would skip the wheel and use a 4×4 block and mitered 2×4 on both sides since the wheel is convenient but the vertical height makes it unsteady.

vertical pallet garden tutorial

6. One to two people can easily move the herb pallet garden with the supports only and without the wheel. Our original plan was to also attach a handle to the one side (for tipping and wheeling around however kiln dried pallet wood is VERY dense and our screws just kept breaking off…so, no handle for now).

7. Next I stained the pallet using Rustoleum’s Wood Stain (Kona), wiping away after applying. I let it dry and cure for a few days (although Rustoleum’s stain dries in about one hour).

staining pallet

8. I moved the pallet outside and gave it a spray of protective clear coat.

vertical pallet

9. Once that was dry, I used junk mail/newspaper to create a pattern, including room for folding the fabric edge under and the sides of the pocket. Then used my pattern to cut the fabric weed barrier to size.  vertical pallet garden tutorial

10. I folded under the edges and stapled the fabric weed barrier into place between the pallet boards to create a pocket.

vertical pallet garden tutorial

11. Corners were tricky…do what works for you. I can’t explain my complicated folding technique. I think I got a little staple-happy.

12. I just kept cutting and stapling the fabric weed barrier into place. My pallet has 12 planting pockets. All done!

planting pallet garden

I’ve started some herbs from seed, but I purchased these already started herbs from Lowe’s to fill it up. Instant fresh herbs! Hurray! I planted:

DIY herb garden

  • basil
  • parsley
  • rosemary
  • dill
  • oregano
  • thyme
  • peppermint
  • chocolate mint
  • spearmint
  • tarragon
  • lavender
  • another type of spicy globe basil

Next I moved it into place. Unfortunately our patio is getting a little crowded so rather than have it free standing/showing both back and front, up next to the patio swing seemed to be the best location. (Until I rearrange…you know how I love to move things around!)

vertical pallet herb garden

Again, I’d recommend support on both ends instead of the wheel. It’s unsteady with the one wheel/one person. Live and learn and DIY experimenting. It’s easy enough, even planted, for one person to move without the wheel. I think two side supports is a better option. It’s also two sided. It’s perfect for creating a border on a patio. Great for small spaces too!

Doesn’t it look amazing?! I looooove it!

free standing vertical pallet herb garden

We spend most of our time on the patio on pretty days…I love the fresh herbal scents too!

free standing pallet herb garden

And having fresh herbs right off of the kitchen is so convenient.

free-standing-vertical-pallet-herb-garden

Whatcha think?

More patio projects…

patio-makeover   outdoor patio swing makeover

 

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DIY {half} globe light fixture cover

DIY Globe Light Fixture Cover

After I completed the wall mounted-pallet shelf, I updated some of the light fixtures including the one in the sitting room…

allen-roth-edison-orb

Allen + Roth Edison Oil Rubbed Bronze

However, the glass on this specific light is very thin and it cracked during the final stages of assembly, just by screwing in the light bulb. The crack was located in such a way that it wasn’t safe. I feared the entire glass piece was going to come crashing down.

cracked-glass

So, one rainy day, I gathered some supplies from around the house and created a new cover? fixture? globe? well, northern hemisphere at least.

DIY-globe-light-fixture-cover-tutorial

Here is what I did:

Materials: 

  • LOW WATTAGE light bulb
  • old globe (I have an addiction. I can’t pass up a globe at the thrift store, thus a collection on hand.)
  • craft paint (I had DecoArt’s Patio Paint/rich espresso on hand.) A high heat/temperature paint is a better, safer option.
  • double fold bias tape (Again…I had brown left over from a patio cushion project.)
  • hot glue
  • Sharpie
  • Edited to add: Flameproof coating

Tools:

  • Utility knife
  • Needle-nose pliers
  • Scissors
  • Glue gun
  • Craft paint brush

I started by disassembling the globe by gently pulling the frame from the north/south pole. My globe popped right out.

globe

I also chose a globe that wasn’t in the best shape, so the north and south hemispheres just pulled apart. (Cut seam along the equator with a utility knife if needed.)

split-globe

Next, using a Sharpie, I traced the fitting (or draw a circle the size of where the globe will be held into place on the light fixture).

globe-light-tutorial

I used a utility knife to remove some of the map/cardboard and discovered a metal circle underneath. I was able to remove it with pliers. Then cut away the rest of the cardboard/paper with a pair of scissors.

globe-light-cover

I painted the inside of my globe and let it dry (well, sort of. I may have been too eager to move on to the next step)…

paint-inside-globe

Then attached the bias tape around the perimeter with hot glue.

gluing-bias-tape

Since I was impatient with waiting for paint to dry and had a little “oopsy”…paint on the bias tape, I used a Sharpie to create a design to distract from the accidental smudge. Imperfection adds character.

globe-light-border

Ready to install.

globe-ceiling-light-cover

Heading to the basement: This is also the path to the basement and I can breathe a sigh of relief that the cracked glass isn’t going to hurt someone when it comes crashing down or that it’s no big deal if my 6’2″ husband carrying a ladder accidentally hits the globe. I kept worrying he’d ‘ding’ that thin glass on his way through…now, it’s okay.

sitting-room-ceiling

It fits with the style of our sitting room too…

sitting-room

Easy enough.  (Would also work as a lamp shade…decorative only.}

half-globe-light-cover

 Mystikit: Purchase the materials and tools needed to make this half globe light fixture cover.

sitting-room-diy

*more DIY projects in this space:

 *This light shade is mainly decorative. In our home, it is rarely turned on for more than a few minutes at a time. Please do your homework and consider safety in your own home before using a globe as a light fixture. 

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Weekend Bloggy Reading

How to install a tiled backsplash

We’re finally shopping for tile for behind our stove area so I wanted to revisit how our kitchen has evolved and the tile we chose for our back splash as well as review the steps we took to install the tile. Our kitchen when we bought the house was outdated…

When we moved we only paint the walls green, inserted new SS appliances and range hood. We lived with it for 3 years then painted the cabinets and finally replaced the countertop with granite (Virginia Jet Mist). Working as time and budget allow sometimes mean waiting for the things we want.
tile-backsplash-tutorial
We had a savings to get started on our dream kitchen (the dream where we have savings but the dream without winning the lottery.
The back splash:

Materials:
Venatino Polished Marble Tiles 12×12 mosaic, 5 Venatino Pencil Borders
OmniGrip Maximum Strength Adhesive
Tile Guard Natural Stone Penetrating Sealer
QuartzLock Grout - silver
FrogTape
Caulk

Tools:
Tile saw
Trowel
Float
Putty knife
Bucket
Sponge
Bucket
Paper towels
Rags
Caulk gun
DAP Pro Caulk Tool Kit

Back Splash Tutorial:

1.  Apply caulk to gap where countertop meets the wall.

2.  We used a DAP Pro Caulk Tools to make an even/straight line, but a using your finger (and water) works just as well.

3.  Prep area.  Cover countertop or clean as you go to protect the counter top.

4.  Upper cabinets sit back further than the edge of the countertop. We wanted out backsplash to cover the entire area. We started at the edge of the counter for our backsplash. Decide how your tile edge will be finished.  We used a matching border from the countertop’s edge vertically and ended at the bottom of the end of the wall cabinet.  We mitered the joint where vertical meets horizontal.
5.  Apply border and tile with OmniGrip Adhesive using a trowel.  Coat the wall (can be done directly on drywall).  OmniGrip is pre-mixed so there’s no guessing on consistency and this product works really well for a back splash.
6.  To lessen breakage and crumbling when cutting (the vibration nearly pulverizes edges of the marble), we used FrogTape on cuts.

7.  Apply pressure to ‘set’ tiles in place.

Another shot of how we ended the tile on the countertop/cabinet edge.

8.   Let dry at least 2 days.

9.  Seal tiles using Tile Guard.  Wipe on with a rag.  It dries within seconds.

10.  After drying, prep area by covering countertops or clean as you go – dried grout {We chose Quartz Lock in a darker gray} will be hard to remove.

Have a bucket of water handy.

11.  Apply generous amount of Quartz Lock to the float using a putty knife.

Quartz Lock is pre-mixed. We cover with a plastic grocery bag, then the lid with a tight seal and save leftover for a future project.
12.  Add grout to spaces between the tiles, filling every gap, working in small areas going to next step and starting again with the next area.  Smoosh it in the gaps.
13.  Using a well-wrung wet sponge, wipe in a diagonal motion (except when necessary against countertop and cabinets), wiping away grout from tile.  Grout should stay in the cracks and gaps, but be cleaned away from tiles.

14.  Rinse sponge.

15.  Repeat.

16.  Let dry.  Grout will hide imperfections/crumbled edges of marble tile.  Don’t stress with tiny chips. Grout will disguise them. We have an old farmhouse, so our motto is “imperfection adds character”.
Before Grout:
After Grout:
Kitchen before:
Kitchen after:
We’re thinking of stainless steel tiles for behind the stove but I haven’t decided on the pattern or shape of tiles yet.
We just calculated that we’ll be in our house 7 years this summer. And we’re ready to put the finishing touches on the kitchen. About time, right?  We’ll be removing the cabinets above the stove to install a proper vent. It means losing those two cupboards but more on a pantry coming soon too. What do you think?
I think the chef’s dream stove/range is on that ‘winning the lottery’ dream kitchen and he’ll have to make do with what we have but it’s functional. Sorry, Mr. DIY.
See more about our kitchen makeover at our Home Tour
DIY Show Off farmhouse kitchen makeover
Similar products for this project:
Star Quartz Quartz Lock 2 Ug Tile Grout-Birch 18lb bucket
Carrara Marble Italian White Bianco Carrera 3×6 Marble Subway Tile Honed
Custom Building Products TLOSQT-3 TileLab OneStep Cleaner and Resealer
Frog Tape 82021 Pro Painters Masking Tape, 1-1/2-Inch by 60-Yards, Green
Pro Caulk Complete Caulking Kit (As Seen On TV)
Goldblatt G02391 1/4-Inch By 3/8-Inch By 1/4-Inch Square Notch Trowel With Plastic Handle
TBC Margin Trowel Float 6″x 2-1/2″ Professional Gum Rubber Face Bonder to Foam Rubber Pad. Speciality Grout Float Designed for Hard to Reach Areas. Narrow Width & Offset Handle Allow Work Under Toe-Kick Space Under Cabinets and Small Areas. Float 11″
SKIL 3540-02 4.2-Amp 7-Inch Wet Tile SawThis is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience. FrogTape Blog Squad

Blue Valentine Vignette

Last year, I created a small blue Valentine vignette in our home.

Valentine decor

 

Ribbon Wreath Tutorial

turquoise Valentine wreath {key to my heart wreath}

The thing about this wreath is I can leave it up a little longer since it shares my March birthstone color. :)
X’s & O’s decorative accent tutorial

I decided to do some X’s and O’s for Valentine’s Day. Hugs and Kisses are always a great accessory, right?  :)

Materials:

  • Cardboard x’s and o’s
  • Deco Art Americana acrylic craft paint {White Wash and Desert Turquoise}
  • Deco Art Victorian Baroque Border Stencil
  • Sanding block

1. I gave my letters two coats of paint and let dry.

2. I sanded the edges for a worn/vintage look.

3. Add decorative touches using a stencil.

That’s it!

What do you think? That’s a DIY photo backdrop…but for all you know, it could be a beautiful wall in my home, right? These accessories are really displayed elsewhere in my home. :)

Do you decorate for Valentine’s day? This year I’m keeping it subtle…

DIY heart ribbon wreath

Valentine’s Decorating Ideas

wink

I’m joining the party:

His & Hers painted pillow covers

His & Hers Pillow Covers

I shared my painted upholstered chairs

Christmas sitting room with painted striped chairs

I also liked that the Serena & Lily chair {my inspiration for the stripe} had matching accent pillows.

Serena and Lily Bark Miramar Racing Stripe Chair

I just so happened to have 2 matching pillow cases on hand. What are the chances? I have had them just sitting in a basket in my craft room along with the other supplies. I love when DIY project was meant to be! {Chairs are actually a light grey and the pillows are a linen color…but they look so well together!}

His and Hers Pillow Covers tutorial

Materials:

  • FrogTape
  • two pillow covers
  • latex paint
  • acrylic craft paint
  • stencils

FrogTape-stripe-pillow-cover-tutorial

I measured the width of the stripes on the chairs and using FrogTape,I created the same stripe on the front of my pillow covers. I did insert a piece of cardboard to prevent paint from soaking through the back side. I filled in my stripe with the brown latex paint that I used on the chairs. I removed the FrogTape and let them dry. Then simply used stencils to spell out “His” and “Hers” (using an acrylic craft paint). I’ve read that you can set the paint with a warm iron.

I also liked that some of the fabric shows through for a worn look.

painted pillow cover

Awe…His & Hers

FrogTape painted striped Hers pillow

Now my chairs are complete! Christmas in the sitting room coming soon! :)

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*This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience. Results may vary. 

FrogTape Blog Squad

Painted Upholstered Chair Tutorial {before and after}

Painted upholstered chairs – story of an unplanned DIY.

Does your DIY ever go like this: I started my day with big plans to finally sew the curtains in the family room. In order to do so, I needed to clean off the dining room table which was piled with boxes filled with ornaments and holiday decor and other junk from the shuffling around, rearranging and decorating {because of course the table in my craft room is piled high with an unorganized cluttered mess that also needs cleaned}.

DIY painted upholstered chair tutorial

Of course clearing the dining room table meant decorating for Christmas which lead me to the room right off the dining room that we’re currently calling the “sitting room”. So, in order to sew curtains for the family room, I had to clean the dining room which meant decorating the sitting room and in there were these chairs.

These $6 thrift store chairs. I loved the color and pattern. But I have had a difficult time with orange, fuchsia and olive green colors. Love them. But they don’t work in our home. I gave them a chance, but not even in our eclectic home. I considered slipcovers but I am decorating this room right now. No materials or time for slipcovers.

{before}

chair before

And I had the brilliant idea to paint them. Right then. That minute.

I had seen the upholstery painting tutorial at Hyphen Interiors in 2011. Loved it. Left an impression. Very inspiring.

I also knew I had most materials on hand. Paint! Everything except the fabric medium. I’ve looked at the bottles for sale at Michael’s in the past {for painted curtains} and knew they weren’t cheap. I was also still in my pajamas and on a mission. Sewing curtains, remember?! But these multi-colored chairs were an obstacle.

DIY girls thoughts: No fabric medium. No budget. No desire to run to the store. Lots of leftover latex paint. The only one who really sits in these chairs is the cat. So for now…if painting doesn’t go right, I can still slip cover them at a later date. GO FOR IT!

I found a left over can of Ralph Lauren paint that I hated working with as it was super watery. Perfect! I watered it down even further with water. I didn’t measure, just created a consistency that was still able to hold to the paint brush but watery enough to be absorbed into the textured fabric of the chairs. I used a 2.5 inchPurdy brush.

I gave the chairs a good cleaning, getting up all of the cat hair (FrogTape works great as a cat fur remover).

And I just started painting. My mixture of latex and water had amazing coverage.

I also taped off the legs using FrogTape.

painting upholstered chair

Sometimes I had to swirl the brush for coverage, then followed up with a straight brush stroke.

painting upholstery

And worked my way along the bottom edges, up the side, around the back, in the creases of the attached cushions and finished by painting the seat back and cushion.

painting an upholstered chair

I took a few breaks and a bigger one between the painting the two chairs. The Paintbrush Cover was perfect for keeping my paintbrush from drying out. It creates an airtight seal during usage. Simply place the brush in the cover and close the lid. After my break, I simply opened the cover, removed my brush. It was like I never stopped painting! {Thanks to Salvatore of the Paintbrush Cover for the gift…definitely something that’s going to get a lot of use around here. If you paint a lot…visit the link above to purchase a few for yourself. Definitely useful and convenient! 2 must have DIY paint tools to have on hand: FrogTape and the Paintbrush Cover.}

The Paintbrush Cover

One coat. It dried fairly fast. I removed the FrogTape which perfectly protected the wooden legs. Who even noticed those pretty legs with that crazy printed fabric before? Discovery: She has legs with beautiful carved detail!

removing FrogTape

The texture which was lost in the busy pattern…

before

upholstery before

now shows the quilted pattern with a solid color…

after

painted upholstery after

SO PRETTY!

And before you ask, yes…without the fabric medium, my chairs are rough. They have a vinyl look and feel. Since the paint is watered down…it’s not going to crack or chip or anything. The paint is absorbed into the fabric. I would recommend NOT skipping the fabric medium and to use the recipe shared by Hyphen Interiors. However…if you find yourself in a DIY emergency like me and aren’t particular about a sort of vinyl look/feel. And you have to do something or your entire Christmas decorating is going to be a big fail and you’ll never move on to the project that you planned to complete in the first place…I must tell you, I love these chairs now. Forget the slipcovers.

I knew I wanted to do more than just have a set of solid light grey chairs. My inspiration:

Serena & Lily Bark Miramar Racing Stripe Chair

Serena and Lily Bark Miramar Racing Stripe Chair

Of course I know that my chairs aren’t the same shape. They’re slender girls with long legs. But that stripe. I love that stripe. Not quite a knock off or copy cat project, but it’s what inspired my next steps…

I found the center of the chair and using FrogTape, created a stripe down the middle. I was sure to burnish the edges where the tape would meet paint. And using  leftover {watered down} brown latex paint, I painted in my stripes from bottom of the front of the chair, over the cushion, up seat back and down the back of the chair.

FrogTape stripe

I removed the FrogTape while the paint was still wet, pulling away from the wet paint. I did take a wet paper towel to carefully wipe away wet paint where a tiny bit seeped under the tape due to the texture of the fabric. See – it’s a good thing I have that vinyl-ish finish!

Removing FrogTape Stripe

Amazing transformation, right? Love it!

striped painted upholstery

Now I’m happy with my $6 chairs.And I was able to decorate the sitting room for Christmas.

See more Painted Upholstery Chair pictures in the sitting room mini makeover. 

painted upholstered chair tutorial

His & Hers painted pillow covers

painted pillow cover

{tutorial}

His and Hers Pillow Covers tutorial

I was able to get the dining room table cleared off and decorated and the clutter put away. (okay…for real, some of that was shifted to the craft room table which is dangerously close to an avalanche. Shhhh!)

I still haven’t sewn 6 of the 8 family room curtain panels. {Remember the no sew ruffled ombre tree skirt and the sewing machine being at the repair shop? One of these days I’ll get those curtains done. You don’t remember that I’ve had the fabric since June, do you?}

Perhaps another day, I’ll have a DIY plan that will go according to plan.

Joining the party here:

shabby creek cottage Beneath My Heart

 

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*This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience. Results may vary. 

FrogTape Blog Squad

How to Make a NO SEW Ombre Ruffled Tree Skirt

{no sew} Ruffled Ombre Tree Skirt Tutorial

With an eclectic family room makeover in progress, we’re decorating the Christmas tree with fun non-traditional colors for Christmas. I know – my house is a mish mash of themes but I do what I love and I’m loving walking from room to room with a different scene. However, finding a colorful non-traditional tree skirt is nearly impossible. Then I remembered that few years ago, I stumbled across a no-sew ruffled tree skirt and although I don’t remember where I saw it, I remember it was a lot easier than I imagined.

No Sew Ruffled Ombre Tree Skirt tutorial

It’s much harder to explain how to do it in words than actually working on this. It’s so easy! This could even be done using a sewing machine (which was my plan but I had to go to Plan B when my sewing machine stopped working). It is time consuming but can be done in one day if you work on it a lot. I made mine in two days. Crank up the Christmas tunes!

Here’s how I did it: 

Materials:

  • round vinyl/flannel back table cloth
  • 5 colors of lightweight fabric (dark to light in color). I purchased 2 yards of the darkest, 2 yards of the second darkest, 1.5 years of the next color, 1 yard of the lightest colors. Yes, a lot. I bought 7.5 yards of fabric. {Use coupons! Look for sales/clearance fabric.}
  • Hot glue (approx. 100 glue sticks) OR swap out hot glue for sewing
  • Duct tape

Tools: scissors, iron

Tutorial:

1. My round table cloth was was too large. I started by folding it in half and placing it under the tree. This gave me an idea of where I’d want to cut. I didn’t measure. Just decided I needed to cut off about 10-12 inches. no sew tree skirt 2. I folded the half circle table cloth in half again to create a pie-slice shape. Then just cut {rounding it} approx. 10″ from the outer edge. how to make a no sew tree skirt 3. Snip the pointed edge of the folded table cloth. no sew ruffled tree skirt 4. Cut along one fold from outer circle to inner. no sew tree skirt tutorial 5. Place under the tree and decide if more needs to be trimmed. And if I liked the “Twister” vibe of my vinyl table cloth, I’d be done! But, um. No. Something better in mind.

no sew tree skirt

Tip: cover edges of smaller hole {where tree trunk will be}  with duct tape. I used FrogTape. This little area is susceptible to tearing…tape will help prevent tears.

6. Spread out fabric {keep folded}. Any size strips will do. Larger widths will create bigger ruffles. Smaller widths, smaller/more ruffles. I decided on small 4 1/2 inch wide strips. I marked the fabric and cut my strips (no need to be a perfectionist about perfectly straight strips but keep as straight as possible). Length doesn’t matter. Most of my fabric was 54″ wide, but one of my fabrics had a smaller width.

no sew ruffled tree skirt

A lot of strips! 7. Time to iron. And iron. And iron some more.

no sew tree skirt tutorial

Take a break.

8. Start at the outer edge, along the vertical cut (the back of the tree skirt). Folded edge towards you, raw edge will be glued. Place the strip of fabric so it hangs off the vinyl table cloth.  I applied hot glue to the end of a strip of fabric, attach to back side on flannel and wrap around to the front of the vinyl (only about an inch or so on the back). no sew ruffle tree skirt 9. I worked in about 4-6inch sections (just eye-balling it, making sure to hide the outer edge of the vinyl table cloth. I applied a line of hot glue, then pressed the raw edge of the folded fabric strip onto the hot glue line. AS I WENT, I’d create “pinch” pleats (glue a straight 2-3 inches, fold the fabric up towards you, then press down another 2-3 inches of fabric strait onto the hot glue line.

no sew ruffled ombre tree skirt tutorial

10. Insert a small amount of hot glue into the folded fabric. Press down flat.

no sew ruffled ombre tree skirt tutorial

11. Attach the little flaps with a dab of hot glue if needed.

no sew ruffled ombre tree skirt tutorial

12. Repeat and continue. no sew ruffled ombre tree skirt tutorial 13. When another strip of fabric is needed, open end of fabric, place the end of the last fabric strip, add some glue and fold. (Just create an extended strip of fabric).

no sew ruffled ombre tree skirt tutorial

14. When completing the row around the edge of the circle, cut strip of fabric about an inch and fold onto the flannel back and secure in place with hot glue {as shown in step 8}.

15. Continue onto the next row. Since my ruffles were smaller, I used up all of my darkest color then continued onto the next color. Sometimes it was in the middle of a ruffle, most of the time, I ended a color at the end of a row. My fabric mostly ran four rows. Working towards the center, will require less fabric.

no sew ruffled ombre tree skirt tutorial

16. I noticed that as I worked, my circle wasn’t so perfect anymore. I kept going. Around the trunk area, inner tree skirt, I did have to fill in with fabric strips…again, it’s not perfect…just play with creating more ruffles under what you’ve done, if you see vinyl showing through or have vinyl that’s not circle shaped towards the end. No one will be able to tell…just create pleats/ruffles with the same color to fill in.

17. Near the “trunk” part of the tree skirt, I finished off with a sheer white double ruffle from my scrap supply. You can use wide ribbon…create a double ruffle by hand with a running stitch with thread (no knot) in the center length wise and pulling ends to “gather”. Or use ribbon or bias tape, or follow the same steps but do the last row upside down, gluing raw edge to raw edge, creating pleats/ruffles. Cover hot glued raw edges with thin piece of pretty ribbon using hot glue. no sew ruffled ombre tree skirt tutorial 18. I ran a length of duct tape up the ends of the ruffles on the back side just to keep things neatly tucked down.

ruffled tree skirt

Looks like an expensive professionally sewn beautiful tree skirt, right? So pretty in any color, even drop cloth or burlap or how about using white flat sheets? You’ll have to let me know if you give this a try {or if you already have!}. I’d love to see it!

ombre ruffled tree skirt

Oh – and you will experience some hot glue burns. No sew doesn’t mean no pain. Ouch! But they only hurt for a few seconds.

teal ombre ruffled tree skirt

{Leftover fabric strips were torn into thinner strips and used as garland.} Stop back later this week for Christmas tree pictures!

Don’t miss a post and see sneak peeks first by following along:

Partying here:

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Holiday Craft Party at Centsational Girl

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman tutorial {Wayfair DIY Challenge}

Remember, oh I don’t know, 10 years ago (Just kidding. It feels that way!) when I started our family room makeover? Then we got sidetracked with an apartment renovation but since we’re wrapping up the last minute details there, the family room makeover is back on my DIY schedule. Of course that means a lot of DIY projects, decorating and furnishing and on that list was a DIY upholstered tufted ottoman. 

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman

Challenge: Have you heard of Wayfair.com? It’s the largest online retailer of home furnishings and decor, with millions of products for the home that fit any style and budget. They believe that getting crafty with your decor is one of the best ways to add a unique personal touch to your home. That’s why they created the DIY Blogger Challenge. I was invited to participate and had the option to choose from a coffee table, book case or pendant light. All fun products but I took one look at the coffee table and knew I wanted to create an upholstered tufted ottoman.

pinterest challenge logo

And as I found many tutorials and inspiration on Pinterest, I’m joining the Fall Pinterest Challenge as well. I have built an ottoman in the past {see my tips for building an ottoman} but tufting is a new experience to me and one I’ve been wanting to try for a while now. My ottoman upholstery/tufting experience: 

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman tutorial

Here’s what I did: 

  • Furinno Espresso Coffee Table
  • 4″ foam (This can be pricey. Use coupons or try foam from an egg crate twin bed cushion.) 
  • batting
  • fabric (I purchased 1 1/2 yards. 1 yard for the project, scrap for button covers)
  • spray adhesive
  • tools: scissors, Sharpie, yard stick, drill, electric knife, felt tip pen, screwdriver

I started by laying the coffee table top on my foam and measuring just a little bit bigger (about 1/2 inch).

DIY tufted ottoman - marking foam

Using an electric knife, I cut out my piece of foam.

DIY Ottoman Tutorial - cutting foam

With a yard stick and measuring in halves, I made a grid on the foam with a Sharpie. Then decided where I wanted my button tufts to be located. I did 3 rows totaling 11 buttons (4 buttons, 3 buttons then 4 buttons). 

DIY ottoman tutorial - grid on foam

I poked a hole where I wanted my button tufts using a screw driver. Then flipped my foam and poked through that side as well.

DIY ottoman tutorial - poking holes in foam

The screwdriver pushed out the foam, creating a small hole all the way through the foam. 

DIY ottoman tutorial - poking holes in foam

I flipped my coffee table top back side up, laid the foam on top and using a felt tip pen pushed into the holes, I made a mark on the table top where I’d want to drill holes for tufting. 

DIY ottoman tutorial - marking drill holes

I drilled the marks, then flipped the table top over and cleaned up that side of the drilled holes by drilling through them again. 

DIY ottoman tutorial - drill holes

Next I used a spray adhesive to attach the foam to the table top. 

DIY ottoman tutorial - spray adhesive for foam to wood

Then covered the foam with batting (cut just a half inch longer than the edges of the foam and table top).

DIY ottoman tutorial - cover foam with batting

I covered the batting with my fabric. Again, measuring and cutting just enough to pull onto the underneath for stapling. 

DIY ottoman tutorial - cover with fabric

Tufting:

  • fabric scrap and button kit (or buttons for tufting)
  • upholstery needles
  • wax covered button thread DIY ottoman - tufting materials
  • anchor buttons
  • staples
  • tools: stapler, scissors

I put together the fabric covered buttons I wanted to use on the top of my ottoman for tufting. 

DIY ottoman tutorial - fabric covered buttons

Then, I threaded the largest upholstery needle with the waxed button thread. (I had no idea what this was for when starting but learned through use that the wax helps hold the tufted button when the waxed thread is pulled tight.) I attached the fabric covered button to my threaded needle and started at the center of my upholstered table top. Locating the hole is tricky (I did lift my batting to help guide my needle). Find the tufting hole and poke the needle through the fabric, batting, foam hole and into the hole in the wooden table top, pulling the needle out the bottom of the table top.

Thread an anchor button onto the needle. Thread the needle back through a second hole in the anchor button and back up through another hole one more time.  Push the button down towards the hole in the wooden table top. Pull tight.

While thread is pulled tight and anchor button is secure against the wooden table top, staple thread onto the wooden table top a few times using a zig zag pattern.

Leaving enough thread to tie a knot, cut the thread and put the needle aside. Tie a knot in the thread.

DIY ottoman tutorial - tufting tutorial

Repeat. I worked from the middle out. Note: I used random anchor buttons I already had on hand.

The front will look like this:

DIY ottoman tutorial - button tufting

Move completed tufted table top to an area where it can lie flat. Pull the fabric tight around the sides of the foam to the under side of the tabletop and staple into place. Start in the middle of each side and smooth batting and fabric as you go. 

DIY ottoman tutorial - stapling fabric

Then work on the corners. Wrap them like a present. There is no wrong way, just try to create a smooth corner. Staple into place on the bottom of the table top. Be sure to stay clear of the pre-drilled holes for attaching the legs to the table top!

All done! For added security, I covered my buttons and thread with duct tape (not shown). Flip and admire your upholstered tufted ottoman cushion!

DIY ottoman tutorial - upholstered tufted bench

Assemble the rest of the coffee table as per instructions. Attach newly upholstered tufted top just as you would the regular top according to the directions. Assembly was extremely easy.

DIY ottoman - assemble coffee table

  • tools: screwdriver, rubber mallet 

Accessorize: What I loved about this coffee table is that it has two bottom shelves and comes with bins! I gave the bins a little makeover using FrogTape and fabric paint and added chalkboard labels that I had on hand. 

DIY ottoman - painting bins

Now I have an upholstered tufted ottoman for the family room!

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman

DIY upholstered tufted ottoman

What do you think? Pretty easy and affordable. Visit wayfair on facebook here or on pinterest here.

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Disclosure: Thank you to Wayfair for the coffee table and the challenge and to Giftcards.com for providing the gift card for my project materials. This post was also partially sponsored and brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience and project results may vary. 

 FrogTape Blog Squad

Linking up:

TDC Before and AfterHome Stories A2Z
and more about the Fall Pinterest Challenge from these sweet friends hosting:
Katie from Bower Power Blog
Sherry from Young House Love
Sarah from Ugly Duckling House
Carmel from Our Fifth House

Refinishing Hardwood Floors {apartment progress}

How I refinished the apartment hardwood floors…

When we started the apartment renovation, I knew the hardwood floors would need to be refinished. Previous tenants had some sort of mishap and the finish was ruined…{I try not to think long and hard about the details of the mishap. ::shudder::}

condition of hardwood floors before:

hardwood floors before

We started by sanding the floors (well, by “we” I really mean, I supervised while my nephew controlled the beast known as the orbital sander). Once the steps to strip the old finish was completed and floors and sawdust were cleaned up, we were ready to refinish the original hardwood for a new look.

All sanded!

sanding hardwood floor

I headed to True Value for the materials I needed {and a few other things too but more coming on that soon}:

  • Minwax Wood Finish, stirred not shaken {Color is “Dark Walnut”}. Minwax has great informational guide too.
  • Minwax High Build Polyurethane (clear satin), stirred not shaken (martini is optional)
  • FrogTape
  • angled 3.5″ Purdy paintbrushes – “White Bristle” {recommended for stain}
  • angled 3 ” Purdy brush – “Black China Bristle” for polyurethane
  • old clean rags {I actually had these on hand but you CAN buy them at True Value too!}
  • Optional: latex gloves {I lived with brown stained nails for a day or two…oops.}
  • Suggestion: pillow for knees and definitely old clothes {not sold at True Value}
  • 220 grit sandpaper
  • Mineral spirits and clean rags

Staining Hardwood Floors

The process is a fairly simple DIY. The task is just time consuming (and a little labor intensive because of my position on ‘old knees’). Since I was working with two small rooms, I opted to use a brush and work on my hands and knees vs. a roller.

I started in a far corner of the room, working with the wood grain, with the direction of the wood planks, working my way out of the room – don’t work yourself into a corner – no fun being trapped!

For extra protection, tape off baseboards/shoe molding using FrogTape.

I dipped my Purdy brush into the can of Minwax stain, tapped off the extra and applied the stain in a corner, working along the baseboard along the length of the wood plank. When I noticed that some of the stain wasn’t absorbing, I let it sit for a few minutes then wiped away the excess with an old rag.

staining hardwood floors

I worked in 2-4 foot sections in length as I went along right to left in my room, working my way towards the door. Sometimes I did a larger number of planks as well, just find a rhythm that works for you.

refinishing hardwood floors

Bedroom done. I worked my way out into the hallway…

staining hardwood floors

down the stairs and around the bend…

staining stair treads

and started the main floor in a corner, working my way out the door.

staining hardwood floors

Sounds like I ended up at Grandmother’s place (over the river and through the woods) and a lot quicker than it actually took. ! 

TIPS: Since I’m working my way actually out of the apartment, I had to make sure to grab things I needed like purse, keys, cell phone, etc. Turn off things that you don’t want to leave on during the drying period. The radio blasted during our drying time. Oops!

Note: Two coats can be applied (see Minwax for further instructions). I loved the color one coat achieved so I skipped this step. Sealing the floor will also darken the color a bit. One coat of stain:

dark walnut hardwood floors

I let my floors dry a few days but we were working in an unoccupied space. I applied the stain on a Friday and returned the following week to resume refinishing by sealing the floors. Sealing the floors is NOT optional, it’s required. It’s necessary. Stain does not protect the wood, only colors/enhances the beauty.

Sealing the floors…

sealing hardwood floors

I used the same process as above to seal the floors. Starting in the far corner of the room, I repeated the same steps of dipping my paint brush into the polyurethane, tapping, applying in the corner, brushing right to left (the direction I was personally working), along the baseboards and working my way out the door.

It really enhances the rich beautiful color:

minwax high build polyurethane

I let the first coat of polyurethane dry 48 hours.

My most UN-favorite part: once the first coat is dry, lightly sand the entire floor with a 220 grit sandpaper. Clean floors of dust with mineral spirits and let dry. Then apply a second coat of polyurethane using the same steps. Repetitive. Time consuming. But so rewarding!

Allow to dry for 12 hours to resume “light use” (however – test the floor first!). Remove FrogTape.

Stand back, remember the before (try not to gag):

hardwood floors before

Admire the gorgeous after: 

apartment sneak peek alert!

dark walnut stained hardwood floors

Pinterest tip: Did you know that if you rub a wood scratch (floors and furniture) with a walnut (circular motions, filling in the scratch), the walnut oils will fill in the scratch and heal the wood wound? Great snack, too!

Estimated total cost of DIY refinishing 2 small rooms of hardwood (approx. 250 sq. feet) = $250.00 and a few days of recovery…but nothing that would keep you out of your True Value hardware store to prepare for your next DIY. ;)

Joining Sarah’s party today:

TDC Before and After

We were chosen by True Value to be one of the members of the 2012 DIY Squad. I have been compensated for the materials needed for my DIY projects. However, the thoughts and opinions expressed are completely honest and my own. I have not been paid to publish positive comments and no one has twisted my arm to participate. 

This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience. 

FrogTape Blog Squad

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Redoux Interiors’ tips and technique for creating a real wood look…

I’m on vacation this week – hurray! I’ll still be in and out of “the office” but I’m so happy to have a few guests this week. First up is my super talented blog friend, Karen:

Hi DIY Showoff Readers, I am Karen, aka “Good Time Charlie from Redoux Interiors.

I am thrilled to be here filling in for Roeshel. I love Roeshel’s blog so much, probably for many of the same reasons you do. There are really good tutorials here, and I always learn something new. I am going to share with you how to make anything look like wood, for real!

Do you ever find a piece of furniture, especially a table, that you really wished had a rich, wood toned top, and you could paint the rest. The problem? The top is plastic, or veneer that is really in bad shape, or just ugly wood! These nightstands started out like this:

I had a vision for these two. I wanted them to have a rich wood top, and an expensive, creamy glazed body.

I achieved the look by using several layers of glaze. This isn’t hard, and you don’t really need any particular artistic skills, just a little practice, and you can start turning any surface into wood.

I come across a lot of Farm tables like this. Maybe you even have one in your home? The wood top is usually inferior wood that isn’t stainable. Many of these tables are built well, they just need an updated “Redoux”!

If you haven’t worked with glaze before, you might want to start by just familiarizing yourself with how it works, feels. Try antiquing something with glaze, and then adding another darker glaze to deepen the color, you will get the hang of this technique in no time.

Let’s get started, time to gather your materials:

I use Modern Masters products for this technique, they are high quality and the products are concentrated so I end up using less. You can purchase these online through the MM website, some Kelly Moore stores have them, or you can buy them from my distributor HERE. Alternatively, you can use similar products, and high quality, highly pigmented acrylic paints (best purchased at an art supply store)

NOTE: If you are painting a surface where water where will be present, I recommend starting with two coats of an oil based primer, I like Zinnser. Follow this with a light brown standard paint, to make your “base color”.

TIP: You can paint over an oil based primer with water based paints and glazes, but not vice versa. Make sense?

  • Modern Masters Dead Flat Varnish, or Glidden Polycrylic in flat, or very low sheen
  • *Foam roller, or old paint brush
  • *High quality paint brush (I like Purdy Brand)
  • Glazing medium (cream)
  • *Tobacco Brown colorant (or warm wood acryclic paint color)
  • Aged Mahogany colorant (or similar acrylic paint color)
  • Van Dyke Brown or Coffee Bean Brown (this is a very dark brown color)
  • Cheese cloths, cut in half, and wadded up to look like a “pom pom”
  • Chip brushes, 2″, 3″, or 4″ (depending on the size of your piece)

1.Using the foam roller, apply varnish to a clean, lightly sanded surface. Using the high quality paint brush, lay off the varnish in the direction of the grain.

2.When 1st step is dry, prepare your glaze by making a mixture of TB colorant by a 1:6 ratio with glaze. Depending on how big of a piece you are glazing, start by making a small amount, you can always make more.

3. Using a chip brush, apply Tobacco Brown glaze all over surface, generally following the grain, (or if there is none, in the same direction). While this is still wet, apply your Aged Mahogany colorant straight out of the bottle. I like to pour some onto a paper plate and then use a chip brush to (dab it on). It should look like this when you are finished with this step.

4.Now Use your cheesecloth Pompom to pull the glaze in the direction of the grain. The pompom will absorb the excess glaze and softens the look. When your cheesecloth is loaded up with glaze, you can use it to apply glaze to the sides and details. Also, just sort of re”pompom” it to use a dryer section, and continue doing so until your cheese cloth is all used. Use your chip brush to pick up the excess glaze that may have settled in corners and grooves.

5. Prepare your next layer of glaze by using a mixture of the Van Dyke Brown (or very dark brown) in a 1:1 to ratio. This is a very strong mixture, if you want your wood to be lighter, use more glaze to colorant ratio. Apply Dark Brown glaze with a chip brush in the same way you did the first layer. If you are doing a cabinet door, start with the middle, and work your way to edges. Again, soften and “remove” excess glaze with a Cheesecloth “pompom”, following with a chip brush like you did in step #4.

***Optional step*** If you desire a richer, darker look, you can experiment by repeating the first step, just by adding another layer of the Tobacco Brown glaze, and then when dry, another layer of the Dark brown glaze.

6. You can decide to leave your finish as is, or you can take this optional step. When glaze is completely dry, use some of your dark brown colorant straight from the bottle. (Again, I like to pour it onto a paper plate). You can apply some to the edges, using a chip brush, and randomly throughout your piece to “darken” the wood. Use a rag to “blend” the colorant.

8. When you have achieved the desired look, seal with protectant of your choice. I have used wax or a clear coat, or nothing, depending on where my piece will be used. Both will work beautifully with this finish.

Tip: This is one of my favorite glazing “tricks”. You can try this on just about any surface. If you are painting a surface that is not easy to paint, i.e. laminate, etc., then it is a must that you begin with a high adhesive primer.

Here is the kitchen table I did, completely “glazed over”

Before:

Close up of corner:

One more note…..the chairs were black with the same fakey wood on the seats. I used my sprayer to paint out the chairs and the table base with Sherwin Williams Tricorn Black in an outdoor paint they carry called “Resilience”. I don’t usually use an exterior paint for indoor use, but this family has small children, entertains often, and I decided to go with something that would hold up to all kinds of wear and tear, and lots of wiping down!

The wonderful thing about this glaze treatment is the endless choices of wood tones you can come up with. Once you get comfortable with this method, you can begin experimenting with all different colors of glaze and colorants. Here are some other samples of work I have done using this technique:

This bathroom was honey colored Oak. The owner’s master bedroom was all Cherry Stained wood, I added more red tones using more Aged Mahogany to achieve this look:

This bathroom had all white laminate cupboards and did not match the English Country Style of the rest of the Decor. I used less red and dark tones to achieve this look:

This was a large, very light colored built in Oak cabinet. It didn’t suit the new owner’s tastes. Instead of stripping and staining the entire piece. (which would have been very long, laborious, and EXPENSIVE!), I used my glazed wood technique. The new owner’s were delighted. They had a rich, dark, built in, for a fraction of the cost and time it would have taken to strip and stain the entire piece.

Hopefully I inspired you to go create your own wood on some unsuspecting furniture! It is really fun to experiment with this technique. I would love to hear from you if you have more questions, or even better, see your results!

 What an awesome technique! Would you look at that gorgeous dark rich wood? ::insert whistle:: Thank you so much, Karen for sharing your tricks with us! Can’t wait to give this a try!!!