Dresser Makeover

I recently had an opportunity to try out Maison Blanche furniture paint and just happened to have an old painted dresser that needed a fresh new look. If you know me, you know I like to rearrange furniture from room to room and as is (before) just wasn’t versatile. Time for a change! 

dresser makeover before

No prep? You got it! No stripping, no sanding, no priming! Count me in! Here is the dresser before. I wiped it down to clear away the dirt and dust, removed the drawer pulls then jumped right in. Color is La Bonne Terre…to me it looks like a very light putty (sort of an ivory with a gray tone). 

painted dresser prep

Being a DIY’er, I paint. A lot. And one of the things that makes a paint brand my favorite is the paint’s consistency. Maison Blanche paint did not disappoint! It’s thick. It was love at first sight. Plus! If I wanted it even thicker, I could leave the lid off to thicken it up without it developing that plastic-y painty film. Pretty cool!  

Maison Blanche furniture paint

I used a regular 2″ brush and gave the dresser coat of paint then started where I began and did a second coat. It goes on so nice and smooth. The paint had a light odor but it wasn’t unpleasant. 

Dresser Makeover furniture paint tutorial

The next morning, I did a third coat and let it dry for about six hours. The finish is so soft and smooth. In the afternoon, using an old sock, I applied a coat of gray Lime Wax. 

Maison Blanche Lime Wax

After 15-30 minutes, I buffed the wax finish.

It’s difficult to tell but it gives the paint a subtle pretty patina (transparent gray). I let everything dry overnight (because my oil rubbed bronze spray painted drawer pulls were still drying anyway). Then added the pulls and the result…

Dresser Makeover after

…is awesome, isn’t it? Much better! Get your own color at Shannon’s shop, here!

dresser styling

I could re-arrange, style and decorate all day, how about you?

beachy decor

La Bonne Terre with Gray Lime Wax

painted dresser tutorial at diyshowoff.com

Need some more examples and inspiration? You’ll want to check these out: 

 Bayou Blue with White Lime Wax at Fox Hollow Cottage

Fox Hollow Cottage

Magnolia with White Lime Wax at Mom 4 Real

mom 4 real

*I received Maison Blanche paint and Lime wax in exchange for a review. As always – opinion and experience is my own. If I didn’t like it, I wouldn’t be sharing about it! 

Pantry Lighting Details

Some of you were wanting more details on the lighting when I shared the pantry reveal. The lighting in the open pantry area was a challenge. 1. There was no overhead/ceiling light to begin with. 2. Walls and ceiling are plaster. 3. Outlet was old and controlled by a switch on the wall. 

farmhouse pantry

Electrical work for the lighting was not DIY. My husband has installed recessed lighting in the kitchen but he was able to run electrical from the previously installed ceiling light, so it wasn’t quite so challenging. For the pantry area, no previous lighting meant pulling the wires from the wall to the ceiling. He started with drilling holes in the plaster wall and ceiling but the wood beam where wall meets ceiling had us realizing this job was ‘over our heads’ and not just literally. It was at this point that we decided to hire an electrician.

outlets

Then after some thought and to keep labor costs down, I let the electrician know that I wanted the wiring to run on the outside of the wall. He changed the old outlet near the floor (the old type that meant I needed an adapter anytime my plug had three prongs), added another outlet a little higher up to accommodate the microwave sitting on the pantry shelf (so I wouldn’t have to drill holes into the wood shelves for the cord to reach down to the lower outlet) and ran the lighting wiring up the wall, to the ceiling with a 90 degree turn to place the lighting. He also made the switch work for the lighting only, disconnecting the switch from the outlets. In hind site, I think this was something we could have done, but when in doubt, seek professional advice! 

connecting light fixtures

pantry lighting

Cord covers for the wiring from outlets, along the outside of the plaster wall, along the ceiling and connecting each individual light fixture.

I centered the lighting from the front edge of the shelving to the other wall and since I chose pendant lights, I made sure they were out of the way of an opening door. 

Then with the help of FrogTape® Multi-surface, I painted the track oil rubbed bronze. cord cover

I simply taped off either side of the conduit track along the wall and ceiling with my FrogTape and used my thumbnail to activate the PaintBlock® Technology. Then just painted the track. The oil rubbed bronze paint is sticky since it’s oil based so drying time is longer but still worth the work. It took two coats. 

oil rubbed bronze paint

As soon as I finished applying the second coat, I removed the FrogTape. Nice and clean! Note: paint will take a long time to cure!

removing FrogTape

Painting the conduit the same color as the walls and ceiling would help disguise it more but I think the oil rubbed bronze against the white ceiling adds to the industrial charm, don’t you? Especially with the pipe shelving.

RustOleum Oil Rubbed Bronze

I love it!

industrial pantry lights with wall track

Project Supplies:

farmhouse industrial pantry lighting

 We also added a dimmer…

farmhouse pantry

 

{open pantry reveal}

FrogTape Blog Squad

Disclaimer: I received compensation to complete this project for using FrogTape® products. All opinions, projects and ideas are based on my own experience. See the  FrogTape® Blog Squad for more inspiration!

Easy Painted Patterned Accent Wall DIY

Earlier, I shared the pantry reveal and I’ve had a few questions related to one of the walls as to whether or not I used wallpaper.

easy painted accent wall

While I do love the look of wallpaper, I’ve had enough wallpaper removal to last me a lifetime so the answer is ‘no’. It’s paint! If you’re a long time DIY Show Off fan, you know that I am a big fan of using FrogTape® to create fun accent walls (see here, here, here, here) and with the addition of the Shape Tape, there are even more options for a creating a fun accent wall. I’d prefer to lightly sand and repaint than strip wallpaper in the future, wouldn’t you? painted Shape Tape accent wall

My wall is small. I used FrogTape and chevron Shape Tape to create a fun accent pattern with a tribal/Aztec feel. My lines were mostly “eyeballed”… but use a level and pencil if you’re more of a perfectionist.  FrogTape Shape Tape

I started at the bottom of my wall space and created straight lines with the Multi-Surface FrogTape and lined it up with the chevron Shape Tape to create stripes, zig zags and diamonds…no real planning out a pattern…I just got creative working my way about 1/3 of the wall (again, no measuring). FrogTape Shape Tape accent wall Shape Tape Accent Wall

Then worked my way down from the ceiling to about 1/3 of the wall space copying the same pattern I used at the bottom of the wall.

FrogTape Shape Tape application

Next I found the center of the wall and spaced out a similar pattern there to meet the bottom and top design. Since it’s the center, I didn’t feel it had to be a perfect match with the top and bottom pattern. I was right! It only adds to the uniqueness of the design. Here’s how it looked with the taping complete: FrogTape chevron Shape Tape accent wall

I actually painted the walls with my base color last April. It’s Valspar (Cool Grey). I didn’t want a loud bold design, so I used some leftover True Value Platinum (Old Fashioneda light blue/gray) from our kitchen walls as the accent color. 

Once my tape design was complete, I used a credit card to burnish the edges of the tape as I worked by rubbing the tape edge then painting the section. I only did one coat (again, I wasn’t looking for bold results and wanted the irregularity of one coat). This wall is bumpy in places so just doing a light colored pattern helps to take focus off of the wall’s imperfections.   FrogTape tutorial

As soon as I was finished painting, while the paint was still wet, I removed the tape. removing FrogTape

So within a 1-2 hour time frame, my wall had an awesome new ‘wallpapered’ look with a subtle design! Painted Pantry Accent Wall  

painted Shape Tape accent wall

I was going for a tribal or Scandinavian vibe. From a distance, it reminds me of writing paper. Remember it from grade school?

farmhouse pantry 

What I love about this: Cost for 1 roll of FrogTape and 1 roll of chevron Shape Tape is less than a roll of wallpaper! Use leftover paint!  It’s also less time consuming and less work – all for the same look as wallpaper without the headache to install or remove plus the option to personalize colors and design. 

FrogTape Blog Squad

Disclaimer: I received compensation to complete this project for using FrogTape® products. All opinions, projects and ideas are based on my own experience.

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Quick Resource for Easing the Painting Process

There’s progress in the laundry room! The walls have been painted!

It’s always helpful to take a little refresher course before starting a project and of course our DIY blog friend, Lindsay from Makely Home, does a great job with the Glidden “Show Me How” videos (she’s such a natural). 

Since I do a lot of painting, I always have paint supplies on hand but when I ventured down to the basement this time, I noticed that my angled brush had seen better days. And I have to tell you, when I’m ready to paint…I want to do it right then. No shower, no make up and no desire to run to the store. So these tips for cutting in and getting clean lines were super helpful! 

Then I followed up by rolling the “w”…

It doesn’t matter that I’ve painted dozens of rooms. Taking 1 minute to review those two videos ensured my DIY process went off without a hitch. See all of the Glidden Show Me How videos here

Embarrassing half of the laundry room before…I couldn’t take that chaotic mess or naked flooring any more! laundry room before

In progress (patched walls)… laundry room progress

Now…I chose a white base since this room is in the middle of the house with no window and no natural light.  laundry room walls

Nothing too exciting to show but it sure feels exciting! My walls look beautiful. So fresh and clean and one step closer to being done. And yes…there’s a fun bold painted wall design coming up then onto the baseboards. I’ll share the floor this week too. Stay tuned!

Because there’s so much “life” going on outside of DIY Show Off, the laundry room progress has been slow but hoping to get things going a little faster to get ‘er done! 

This post is sponsored by Glidden. As always, thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

Glidden “Show Me How” Videos

With tiling the laundry room floor DONE, it’s time to move on to painting the walls! Painting is my favorite DIY…inexpensive and easy with big impact. When it comes to painting, even the most experienced painter can use a short refresher course. 

Glidden

So with a painting project going on this weekend, I took a few minutes to watch a few of the Glidden “Show Me How” videos to be sure I didn’t miss a step. Short, sweet and helpful! 

One of the first things to cross my mind when it comes to a room makeover is paint color. How about you? Sometimes it’s difficult to know where to start. So many color options! Well…Glidden has some tips for picking paint colors. Great advice! In fact, the paint colors I choose for the laundry room are inspired by an area rug.

I purchased my paint earlier in the week. It’s my plan to get started this weekend. I’m glad I watched this video on prepping walls to paint because I’m taking 30 minutes to prep my walls which will include filling holes, patching and sanding…then I can dive right in to opening the paint can first thing Saturday morning. 

As you were watching, did you think to yourself “HEY! That gorgeous woman looks familiar!”? Yep! That’s our talented DIY friend, Lindsay from Makely Home! She is such a natural! So even if you know all there is to know about painting – check out Lindsay in Glidden’s “Show Me How” videos. Each one is less than a minute long and it never hurts to brush up on some quick how-to tips. 

See all of the Glidden Show Me How videos here

Wondering about my inspiration? Here’s that rug I love but don’t have room for on the floor. So a copy-cat design small accent wall it is. If you want to go bold, the laundry room is a great space to give it a try, right? 

inspiration

{image source: Nate Berkus design, Decor Pad}

Rug…Ikea Stockholm

Ikea Stockholm rug

Do you have a paint project in your near future? Let’s hear about it!

This post is sponsored by Glidden. As always, thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

Painted Stenciled Paneled Walls

Angel’s Room: When my sister planned her move from Florida to PA last summer, I can’t tell you how happy we all were! We love having her ‘home’!  The budget for decorating their rental home was super tight. I wanted to surprise my teenage niece, Angel, with some pretty and fun accents in her bedroom. I know it’s not easy for a 16-year-old to move away from friends, but we are so excited to have our family local again. I wanted her to have a welcoming, pretty space of her own.

This blog post is sponsored by FrogTape. The walls are paneled (that old faux-paneling sheets) and since it’s a rental, we had no choice but to ignore the ugly green carpet.Thankfully it was clean, only in this one bedroom and in decent shape.

paneled walls before

Rental Tip: It never hurts to ask the landlord if cosmetic changes/home improvement materials can be reimbursed or if material receipts can count as cash towards the security deposit. I’m almost always given a green light. Free labor for the home owner and more personal choices for the renter.

With permission from the landlord to paint the paneled walls, I chose a Valspar Signature Paint + Primer. Color is “Lilac Mist”. Painting paneling is NOT fun. All of those grooves. Hard work! But it is worth the effort. The next day, I then used my damask Cutting Edge Stencil (held in place with a piece of FrogTape) and simply rolled on the stenciled design using leftover white paint.

damask stencil

The result is very subtle and so pretty…

lilac and white damask

I let the paint dry for a day before using FrogTape Delicate on the walls so I could paint the moulding around the room…

FrogTape Delicate

Pretty, isn’t it? Light, soft and subtle and much better! Even the landlord approved.

paneled damask walls

{reveal pictures will be better quality!}

Next up: some thrifty wall decor and room accents.

*This sponsored by FrogTape. FrogTape provided by Shurtech. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience.

 FrogTape Blog Squad

Pantry Progress and PaintStick Review

It’s been one of those weeks where my DIY projects don’t produce a jaw-dropping reveal, just behind-the-scenes DIY. However, there is progress! I recently had the opportunity to review the HomeRight PaintStick. You know how much painting goes on around here and I actually have a thing for paint gadgets (remember the edger?) so I was excited to give this a try.

A few weeks ago, I shared our plans for turning this space…

open pantry before

into an organized open pantry area. Here’s my inspiration, {pantry from Emerson Made}:

Emerson Made open pantry

First up, I needed to prep for painting by filling holes, sanding and taping off what I didn’t want painted with FrogTape. Then I cut in around all of the trim in this room.

paint-prep

This old house has high ceilings so I chose the HomeRight EZ Twist PaintStick to assist me in getting the painting job done.

I watched the helpful videos on HomeRight‘s webpage for tips. They sure made it look easy enough which made me even more skeptical – like a “too good to be true infomercial”. But surprisingly, it was easy! I think opening the package was the most difficult part.

The paintstick holds paint right in the stick! Attach a tube into the paint can, attach the paintstick to the tube, pull back on the handle and “fill ‘er up”.

paintstick-ez-twist

It takes a bit for the paint roller to become saturated, just roll and twist the handle to release the paint. The roller itself has small holes, releasing paint from inside. I had the walls and ceiling painted in less than an hour. It really was awesome!

painting

 

Ugh…that trim. Scratched up from installing bamboo floors and in need of shoe moulding. We’re getting there. In the meantime, I’m planning on doing a subtle stenciling/paint treatment on these walls and ceiling, so both were painted with the same paint in an eggshell finish (color is Valspar Cool Grey).

cool-grey

I was dreading the clean up, but it was surprisingly easy enough and not quite as time consuming as I anticipated. I simply cleaned the parts in the basement utility tub with water according to video directions.

What I liked:

  • Eliminating the need for a messy paint tray and possible drips paint from tray to wall or ceiling. 
  • The speed of painting without having to go back and forth to a paint tray.
  • The coverage (cover an 8’x8′ area with one fill)
  • Minimal paint waste (left over paint stays in the can…easy to empty the paint in the paintstick right back into the can too).

From beige walls and creamy trim to cool gray walls . The walls look so much better, but ahhhhh! That trim! Yellow-y next to cool gray. Guess what I’m doing this weekend?! Ultra white trim coming right up and one step closer to an open pantry! Woo hoo!

cool-grey-paint

So for you: “Yay or nay” for painting gadgets? For me: anything that makes the job easier/quicker!

This post/review is sponsored by HomeRight but the opinion is my own.

This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

FrogTape Blog Squad

Accent Wall Before and After

Patti (my youngest sister) is renting but has permission from the landlord to paint…and to be creative about it too. The entryway wall before had peeling paint…

wall-before

I scraped and sanded until we had a smooth finish. Holes and cracks were patched using DAP’s DryDex (spackling that goes on pink, dries white) and sanded.

dap-drydex-spackling

The walls got a coat of primer and a base coat in a neutral light gray color.

Using FrogTape Delicate (the yellow painter’s tape with PaintBlock Technology, safe for freshly painted walls) the next day, I created a chevron/zigzag pattern.

accent-wall-tutorial

Then painted the zigzag stripes alternating a left-over darker gray paint and left-over gray-beige paint (the color under the tape is a lighter gray).

As soon as I were finished painting the second coat (while it was still wet), I removed the FrogTape Delicate.

removing-FrogTape

Next up cleaning the dingy vinyl floor and decorating.

After (paint is still drying):

accent-wall-after

Patti just happens to work part time for a thrift store so she gets first dibs on all of the eclectic treasures (and has a good eye for what can be transformed). Lucky girl! If it was me, I’d never get out the door with a paycheck. I’d be trading those dollars for thrift store goodies!

Even though the wall now sports a busy pattern in 3 colors, the colors are neutral enough to work in some fun colorful accents and patterns. {All accessories found on Polyvore.}

teal, gold & gray

teal-gray-entryway

 coral, black & gray

coral-gray-entryway

emerald & navy

navy-emerald

gray & mustard

gray-mustard

Looking forward to seeing what she does, how about you? Which color(s) do you like?

This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience.

 FrogTape Blog Squad

Pantry Makeover Prep and #ReadyDoneClean Giveaway

This giveaway is now closed. And the winner is… winner1

winner2

Congratulations, Jessica! I’ll send you an email to get your mailing information!

We’ve been using an enclosed porch as a temporary pantry ever since we removed a closet from our kitchen but with warmer weather approaching, it’s going to need to be moved inside for better temperature control. So, it’s time to start considering a pantry makeover.

Inspiration: I have had this open pantry image from Emerson Made saved in my inspiration files forever.

Emerson Made open pantry

via Apartment Therapy

The ideal spot is the ‘room’ behind this back wall in the kitchen… farmhouse kitchen

It’s wider than a hallway and sits between our kitchen and living room and has FIVE doorways. Time to make the most of what has always been a waste of space. The freezer will be relocated to the basement.

open pantry before

The first step in prepping for painting is to examine the walls and fill any holes, cracks or imperfections with spackling, letting it dry and sanding smooth. My Swiffer Sweeper is handy for cleaning up the spackling dust.

Then time for a little clean up. This area is so dark and un-used, meaning it often gets overlooked even though we walk through here nearly every day. Cleaning up before painting is important. Ever get cobwebs on your wet paint brush? No fun. A Swiffer Sweeper with a dry sweeping cloth works really well by attracting dirt and dust from virtually any surface, including walls, ceiling and baseboards with it’s 360 degree swivel head. With the long Swiffer Sweeper handle, I don’t even need a ladder to dust the 9 foot ceilings and corners.

I DO clean so I’m embarrassed by the dirt that accumulated in this dark, unused space. Yikes! This is just from the ceiling, walls and trim above 5 door frames. It’s not something you’ll want to paint over.

dirt and dust

I can’t believe it took cleaning this room for me to actually see the dirt. Gross! Next prepare for painting by taping off trim. Then paint!

After painting, I use my Magic Eraser. It’s is so powerful that it removes more grime per swipe than the leading all-purpose bleach spray cleaner, and it has no harsh chemicals. I seriously have a basket full of Magic Erasers. With a husband who loves to cook, I use them all.the.time. for cleaning up spills and drips on white kitchen cabinets too.

magic eraser clean up

It’s going to feel so good to use this space, for it to be lighter and organized! I can’t wait!

You can find all of your painting supplies, including the Swiffer Sweeper and Mr. Clean Magic Eraser, at the Home Depot near you. Be sure to visit Paint Like a Pro at HomeDepot.com for a paint calculator and more great DIY painting and tips.

Home Depot P&G Prize Pack

Ready to paint?

Get ready. Get done. Get clean. Giveaway

#readydoneclean-giveaway

DIY Painting #ReadyDoneClean Prize Pack:

  • Swiffer Sweeper
  • Mr. Clean Magic Eraser Original
  • $50 The Home Depot gift card

(1) entry per person: Simply leave a comment below describing your next paint project to enter to win.  Giveaway starts today and ends March 1, 2013. Open to US and Canadian residents. Winner will be chosen randomly and announced shortly after.

*This review and giveaway is sponsored by The Home Depot and Proctor & Gamble, however opinion is my own and these are products I do purchase and use even when not sponsored. Read more about the DIY Show Off disclosure here

Tips for painting a herringbone patterned accent wall

Apartment progress!

Herringbone Accent {on textured} Wall

I’ve shown sneak peeks of the apartment renovation progress and you’ve likely seen the herringbone-like accent wall in the kitchen area…

painted accent wall

Base paint color: True Value Easy Care – Baby Elephant (soft neutral gray) & Accent color: True Value Easy Care – Sweet Honey

Since we own this rental space, I was able to get a little creative in adding a fun accent wall as a backdrop behind some open shelving. Before paint…

apartment walls before

Yes…I have ‘plans’ for a DIY radiator cover but I must confess that I feel it’s a LOT ambitious and I’m scared. Working up the courage to give it a try sometime this month. Anyway, after paint {including painting kitchen cabinets and Rustoleum Countertop Transformations}:

find center of wall

The open wall space above the wainscoting was the perfect spot to display open shelving as a solution for more storage/organization in this tiny apartment. True Value’s Easy Care Platinum and FrogTape were all I needed to add some interest to a flat textured wall. The pattern also helps disguise the un-hidden pipes. I put together a quick tutorial video using my iphone {pardon the portrait orientation, poor quality…amateur videographer but working hard on getting better!} explaining how I achieved the herringbone pattern:

The wall was finished and I was so happy to be able to move forward on the renovation! Shelves are budget friendly Ekby shelving and brackets from IKEA… IKEA Ekby

{installation was super easy using the Master Mechanic Swift Driver!}

Woo hoo! painted accent wall And just when I felt super good about a little DIY success, something went wrong upstairs with the plumbing. The joys of DIY… upstairs plumbing leak I was just too exhausted and heartbroken to deal with it. My Mr. DIY fixed the plumbing issue in the bathroom above and Bri’s boyfriend, Steve, saved the day by patching the ceiling below. patching ceiling textured ceiling and I set about touching up the paint… touching up paint Now, all done for real… herringbone accent wall If you missed it yesterday, I shared the hardwood floors before/after refinishing:

staining hardwood floors

More apartment renovation, decorating and furnishing coming soon!

We were chosen by True Value to be one of the members of the 2012 DIY Squad. I have been compensated for the materials needed for my DIY projects. However, the thoughts and opinions expressed are completely honest and my own. I have not been paid to publish positive comments and no one has twisted my arm to participate.  This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience.  FrogTape Blog Squad

Redoux Interiors’ tips and technique for creating a real wood look…

I’m on vacation this week – hurray! I’ll still be in and out of “the office” but I’m so happy to have a few guests this week. First up is my super talented blog friend, Karen:

Hi DIY Showoff Readers, I am Karen, aka “Good Time Charlie from Redoux Interiors.

I am thrilled to be here filling in for Roeshel. I love Roeshel’s blog so much, probably for many of the same reasons you do. There are really good tutorials here, and I always learn something new. I am going to share with you how to make anything look like wood, for real!

Do you ever find a piece of furniture, especially a table, that you really wished had a rich, wood toned top, and you could paint the rest. The problem? The top is plastic, or veneer that is really in bad shape, or just ugly wood! These nightstands started out like this:

I had a vision for these two. I wanted them to have a rich wood top, and an expensive, creamy glazed body.

I achieved the look by using several layers of glaze. This isn’t hard, and you don’t really need any particular artistic skills, just a little practice, and you can start turning any surface into wood.

I come across a lot of Farm tables like this. Maybe you even have one in your home? The wood top is usually inferior wood that isn’t stainable. Many of these tables are built well, they just need an updated “Redoux”!

If you haven’t worked with glaze before, you might want to start by just familiarizing yourself with how it works, feels. Try antiquing something with glaze, and then adding another darker glaze to deepen the color, you will get the hang of this technique in no time.

Let’s get started, time to gather your materials:

I use Modern Masters products for this technique, they are high quality and the products are concentrated so I end up using less. You can purchase these online through the MM website, some Kelly Moore stores have them, or you can buy them from my distributor HERE. Alternatively, you can use similar products, and high quality, highly pigmented acrylic paints (best purchased at an art supply store)

NOTE: If you are painting a surface where water where will be present, I recommend starting with two coats of an oil based primer, I like Zinnser. Follow this with a light brown standard paint, to make your “base color”.

TIP: You can paint over an oil based primer with water based paints and glazes, but not vice versa. Make sense?

  • Modern Masters Dead Flat Varnish, or Glidden Polycrylic in flat, or very low sheen
  • *Foam roller, or old paint brush
  • *High quality paint brush (I like Purdy Brand)
  • Glazing medium (cream)
  • *Tobacco Brown colorant (or warm wood acryclic paint color)
  • Aged Mahogany colorant (or similar acrylic paint color)
  • Van Dyke Brown or Coffee Bean Brown (this is a very dark brown color)
  • Cheese cloths, cut in half, and wadded up to look like a “pom pom”
  • Chip brushes, 2″, 3″, or 4″ (depending on the size of your piece)

1.Using the foam roller, apply varnish to a clean, lightly sanded surface. Using the high quality paint brush, lay off the varnish in the direction of the grain.

2.When 1st step is dry, prepare your glaze by making a mixture of TB colorant by a 1:6 ratio with glaze. Depending on how big of a piece you are glazing, start by making a small amount, you can always make more.

3. Using a chip brush, apply Tobacco Brown glaze all over surface, generally following the grain, (or if there is none, in the same direction). While this is still wet, apply your Aged Mahogany colorant straight out of the bottle. I like to pour some onto a paper plate and then use a chip brush to (dab it on). It should look like this when you are finished with this step.

4.Now Use your cheesecloth Pompom to pull the glaze in the direction of the grain. The pompom will absorb the excess glaze and softens the look. When your cheesecloth is loaded up with glaze, you can use it to apply glaze to the sides and details. Also, just sort of re”pompom” it to use a dryer section, and continue doing so until your cheese cloth is all used. Use your chip brush to pick up the excess glaze that may have settled in corners and grooves.

5. Prepare your next layer of glaze by using a mixture of the Van Dyke Brown (or very dark brown) in a 1:1 to ratio. This is a very strong mixture, if you want your wood to be lighter, use more glaze to colorant ratio. Apply Dark Brown glaze with a chip brush in the same way you did the first layer. If you are doing a cabinet door, start with the middle, and work your way to edges. Again, soften and “remove” excess glaze with a Cheesecloth “pompom”, following with a chip brush like you did in step #4.

***Optional step*** If you desire a richer, darker look, you can experiment by repeating the first step, just by adding another layer of the Tobacco Brown glaze, and then when dry, another layer of the Dark brown glaze.

6. You can decide to leave your finish as is, or you can take this optional step. When glaze is completely dry, use some of your dark brown colorant straight from the bottle. (Again, I like to pour it onto a paper plate). You can apply some to the edges, using a chip brush, and randomly throughout your piece to “darken” the wood. Use a rag to “blend” the colorant.

8. When you have achieved the desired look, seal with protectant of your choice. I have used wax or a clear coat, or nothing, depending on where my piece will be used. Both will work beautifully with this finish.

Tip: This is one of my favorite glazing “tricks”. You can try this on just about any surface. If you are painting a surface that is not easy to paint, i.e. laminate, etc., then it is a must that you begin with a high adhesive primer.

Here is the kitchen table I did, completely “glazed over”

Before:

Close up of corner:

One more note…..the chairs were black with the same fakey wood on the seats. I used my sprayer to paint out the chairs and the table base with Sherwin Williams Tricorn Black in an outdoor paint they carry called “Resilience”. I don’t usually use an exterior paint for indoor use, but this family has small children, entertains often, and I decided to go with something that would hold up to all kinds of wear and tear, and lots of wiping down!

The wonderful thing about this glaze treatment is the endless choices of wood tones you can come up with. Once you get comfortable with this method, you can begin experimenting with all different colors of glaze and colorants. Here are some other samples of work I have done using this technique:

This bathroom was honey colored Oak. The owner’s master bedroom was all Cherry Stained wood, I added more red tones using more Aged Mahogany to achieve this look:

This bathroom had all white laminate cupboards and did not match the English Country Style of the rest of the Decor. I used less red and dark tones to achieve this look:

This was a large, very light colored built in Oak cabinet. It didn’t suit the new owner’s tastes. Instead of stripping and staining the entire piece. (which would have been very long, laborious, and EXPENSIVE!), I used my glazed wood technique. The new owner’s were delighted. They had a rich, dark, built in, for a fraction of the cost and time it would have taken to strip and stain the entire piece.

Hopefully I inspired you to go create your own wood on some unsuspecting furniture! It is really fun to experiment with this technique. I would love to hear from you if you have more questions, or even better, see your results!

 What an awesome technique! Would you look at that gorgeous dark rich wood? ::insert whistle:: Thank you so much, Karen for sharing your tricks with us! Can’t wait to give this a try!!!

Painted Striped Curtains {apartment sneak peek}

Painting Horizontal Stripes on Fabric Curtain Panels

Renovating, furnishing and decorating an apartment = very tight budget. With the main floor needing six panels, Ikea’s Vivan panels were a perfect choice. A set of two panels for $9.99 – what a deal! And they’re huge! 52″ wide x 98″ long. I love all white curtain panels but for the main living space, I wanted to add a little texture, neutral accent and simple pattern. I love horizontal striped curtains. We decided to go with three large neutral stripes, starting from the bottom.

Not according to plan: My plan was to do an ombre design from black, dark charcoal to light gray. I ended up with something a little different. Here’s how I did it, my suggestions on what I would have done differently and why my stripes aren’t ombre.

What I did: 

Materials:

  • Ikea Vivian curtain panels
  • Paint (fabric paint or latex paint)
  • Sponge rollers (recommend trying foam rollers)
  • FrogTape
  • Tools used: yard stick, iron, sewing machine for hemming if needed

I started by pre-washing and ironing out wrinkles, then spread them out (one at a time) on the dining room table. I used a vinyl table cloth as a “drop cloth” for underneath the panel.

Ikea Vivian curtain panels

Using my yard stick, I started from the bottom and measured 12 inches, then drew a pencil line.

DIY horizontal striped curtains

I used my FrogTape on the outside of my 12″ line to create a crisp border. For the next stripe, I measured 12″ from the edge of the FrogTape. Note: My straight tape lines extended past the panel to secure the edges of the fabric to the vinyl tablecloth to help prevent shifting.

FrogTape for painting striped curtains

I purchased 3 large bottles of fabric paint in black. My plan was to add white to lighten each stripe. However even three bottles of fabric paint does not go a long way with six curtain panels. I ended up using the black fabric paint for the bottom stripe of each panel.

painting striped curtains

painting stripes on curtains

Dip in paint, roll on cardboard/paper towels then roll onto fabric. My cheap rollers meant I had to go over it a few times but once the roller was saturated with paint, it went quicker. 

painted horizontal striped Ikea curtains

Then…since we are on a budget, I used latex wall paint – which is the reason I ended up with a black stripe, gray stripe and greige stripe…not white ombre, but neutral! Tip: {figured this out after the fact}, water down latex wall paint for better absorption.

DIY painted striped curtain panels

I used a sponge roller from the dollar store for each stripe. Tip: DO not use cheap dollar store sponge rollers. Invest a couple dollars in a better quality foam roller. My cheap sponge roller is part of the reason for a “suede” look…which we were okay with and ended up liking the look, but I also would have liked a more solid result. The faded look is pretty too and when time is an issue, it looks even better. ;)

I painted each stripe, let it dry a little, then hung each panel to dry more thoroughly.  So, with six curtain panels, it did take me a couple of days.

drying painted curtain

I wiped the vinyl tablecloth in between laying out each panel. (Pleasant time saving surprise: The paint on my vinyl drop cloth could be seen through the white curtain panels, meaning after the first one, I didn’t have to measure/mark each panel – I just lined it up on the vinyl drop cloth and taped where the previous curtains’ FrogTape lines showed through.)

how to paint striped curtain panels

I immediately removed my FrogTape once painting was complete.

removing FrogTape from painted curtains

Once all of my panels were dry, I measure the length and cut from the top, adding 3 inches to create a rod pocket (cutting from the top or bottom means one of those needs hemmed and I found painting from the bottom up easier). I love using curtain rings, but again, 6 sets of curtain rings adds up, and this is a budget friendly makeover.

measuring and cutting curtain panels

cutting and measuring…

creating rod pocket

sewing a rod pocket

I creased the extra 3 inches with an iron,

ironing rod pocket

then folded about an inch under and ironed that.

creating and ironing rod pocket hem

I sewed a straight line near the bottom of the ironed fold to create a rod pocket.

sewing rod pocket

***I’ll share what I did with the “top” piece of the curtain panels soon – cutting from the top left me with 6 valances, just needing a hem.

I gave each panel another quick iron over and now they’re hanging!

Before apartment makeover:

door before

Just a peek of the apartment windows before:

chartreuse door

Door paint color is Valspar Gilded Pesto (beautiful chartreuse!).

Sneak peek windows after:

DIY painted horizontal striped curtains

Side note: Since the tiny apartment doesn’t have an entry way or closet, I attached some coat hooks (Hobby Lobby) to a board and screwed it to the door – instant cute coat rack. DIY Show Off bag is from Nest of Posies.

painted curtain after

Whatdoyathink? It might make more sense when you see the rest of the apartment, eh? Patience, my friends. I know – not one of my strengths either. ;)

Note: I haven’t washed the curtains after painting, but I’m assuming all will be well – after all, the paint doesn’t wash out of my paint splattered DIY attire.

Update: More apartment details! We are still working on some finishing touches and last minute issues that have come up {the joys of DIY!}, so the reveal has been pushed back. However, there are a TON of DIY details and I’ll be sharing those over the next week or two {and while we’re on vacation}. We think it’s awesome and can’t wait to hear what you think! Little by little…we’ll work up to the reveal!

This is a sponsored post brought to you by FrogTape. The opinions are completely my own based on my own experience. 

FrogTape Blog Squad

Porch Floor Makeover ~ Home Repair Tutor

Good day, DIY’ers! Today I’m excited to introduce you to Jeff from

Home Repair Tutor blog

Like most of us DIY’ers, Jeff started working on home improvement projects on their home and rental properties in order to save money. He shares his knowledge and experiences with the hopes of helping others realize they can save time, money and DIY. I love that he shares his bloopers as well…a great “don’t do what I did” approach to learning.

Recently, Jeff researched the best products and ways to refinish a wooden porch floor and is sharing that secret here today!

Materials for stripping old paint (optional): 

  • Behr Stain & Finish Stripper
  • foam roller (One thing that makes reading enjoyable at Home Repair Tutor is that Jeff uses technical terms like “hot dog” roller! It throws you off for a minute while you giggle but you definitely know what he means!)
  • wire brush
  • tape/drop cloths to cover anything not being stripped (and to cover plants)

Materials for painting the porch:

  • 5 gallon bucket
  • 4 gallons of Restore paint (2 gallons will cover 100 square feet but you will need 2 coats)
  • paint stirrer
  • Restore paint roller kit that comes with a paint grid (some may say screen) for the 5 gallon bucket (Color shown below is Fieldstone)
  • 4 inch paint brush (cheapest available)
  • extension pole for paint roller (optional)
  • paper towels
  • painter’s tape/drop cloths to cover parts not being painted or to prevent splashing

Restore Paint materials

Tutorial:

How to strip a painted porch floor

Jeff started the process with stripping away the old paint in order to achieve an even finish by rolling on the Behr Stain and Finish Remover with a foam roller. He worked in 3-4 rows of floor boards then waited 5-10 minutes before etching the boards with a wire brush. After finishing about 5 square feet of wood, he carefully used a hose to spray off the excess paint and repeated this process until the entire porch was done and let it dry overnight. The next day, this is how it looked:

paint stripped porch

How to painting a porch floor

Pour about 1 gallon of Restore into the white 5 gallon bucket and stir with the wood stirrer to ensure an even consistency. Place the paint screen into the 5 gallon bucket then dip the Restore roller into the paint and move it back and forth on the grid to remove excess paint.The Restore paint roller covers are what provide the rough texture.

Restore Paint Roller Cover

Jeff’s technique for painting with Restore consisted of rolling the paint onto the floor boards with the roller in one direction, moving from right to left. He did cut in first using a 4 inch paint brush and painted the quarter round trim and any other areas that butted against support beams, etc. Moving on, he found that painting 4 to 5 boards with the paint roller then smoothing them with the paint brush worked best. He overlapped the paint brush strokes by one half the width of the paint brush to ensure a consistent & smooth finish. You can see Jeff’s Restore Project video for a better visual explanation.

Jeff states that you can choose to leave the rough texture created by the Restore roller or smooth it out using the brush like he did. He chose the smoother finish over the concern that dirt and grime may get trapped in the textured surface.

The final feel of the Restore paint is grainy and it definitely did an awesome job of making the wood boards more even. There is absolutely no splintering poking through the two coats (recommended by the manufacturer and Jeff).

After one coat:

First Coat of Restore

After letting the paint dry for 24 hours, apply a second coat.

After two coats of Restore paint…

Restore After Second Coat

Once again, here’s the before:

Paint Stripped Porch A freshly painted, slip resistant surface after:

Restore After Second Coat 2

Tips:

  • This does seal the spaces between the boards and rain water will puddle. Best used on porches with a slight downward pitch.
  • Remove painter’s tape as you finish sections. Otherwise, it may be permanently stuck if painted and allowed to dry.

Project cost: $150 (and lasting more than the usual two year period of other finished outdoor areas)

Time involved: Approximately 7 hours (*includes paint stripping time and applying two coats).

Pretty awesome, right? It reminds me of our brushed concrete patio. The Restore paint comes in a variety of colors and is a great alternative to staining. Love the texture. Now…if only I had a outdoor wooden area to paint, this would be my preference. With a stencil involved in those steps. haha!

~*~*~*~

Thanks to Jeff for sharing his helpful porch painting tutorial and Restore paint review! See more of his projects at Home Repair Tutor. (I spy some bathroom tiling tips that I’ve bookmarked for an upcoming project).

I have to tell you that I’m always excited to make new DIY friends around the world wide web. I recently learned that Jeff is local geographically to us. Woo hoo! Another Steeler fan (well, for Mr. DIY since I’m not really into football other than being in the same room while the game is on). But the best part?! If I hit a snag with the apartment renovation, guess who will be getting a call? Be careful when you say “If I was local, I’d totally be helping you!” You just never know who might live next door!

Peacock Blue Painted/Glazed Table Tutorial

Hello! I am Amanda and I blog at mommy is coocoo.
~ My blog is all about fun! ~

mommy is coo coo

Whether you are laughing about the realities of marriage and motherhood or being inspired to make your everyday surroundings lovely, regardless of your budget.

I am especially honored to be doing a guest post for the DIY Show Off.  Roeshel was the first blogger to ever feature this crazy momma and we’ve been blogging friends ever since.
Today I’d like to share a simple glazing tutorial with you. You can see how I turned a $60 craigslist table into this peacock blue masterpiece.
 
I found a table on Craigslist (and Mr. coocoo went and purchased the table with his hard earned money, on his day off.)  I was inspired by several pretty round tables (see those here).
My favorite inspiration table was blue so, out came my peacock blue paint, glaze, and lacquer and my cheap table became the focal point of my family eating area.
How to glaze painted furniture coocoo momma style:
{Before I get started, I would like to say you can do it too! It’s not that difficult, I promise.}
    • I bought a gallon of peacock blue paint from Wal-Mart (cost about $13).
    • I lightly sanded the top of my table with my hand held sander.
    • (and then) I just started painting (see it’s really not that difficult). Paint the entire table and let all the paint dry.
  • Now it’s time to glaze. I bought glaze from Lowe’s or Home Depot (I can’t remember which one). If you aren’t sure what to do, go to the paint department find an employee and tell them you need some glaze. Viola! You will walk out (for about $25 bucks) with something like this.
  • Mix the glaze with whatever paint color you want to add to your already painted furniture. Does this seem scary? It’s not. I chose black paint but you could use whatever color you like.
  • I mixed equal parts glaze and black paint. If this is your first time to glaze don’t freak out, you may want to start out with more glaze and less paint. You can always add more paint to your glaze/paint mixture.
  • Make sure your table is clean (wipe all the dust off from when you sanded).
  • Start glazing! It’s just like regular painting now (clearly, you don’t need a new paint brush). I like to use long horizontal paint strokes. Don’t panic if you get too much paint in one spot! Keep your brush moving. You are going to love it!
  • After your first coat of glaze dries decide if you want to add more glaze (I did because I wanted my table to be a little bit darker. It’s all about preference).
  • Finally, I added this protective finish (bought at Wal-Mart) to the table (This step is a lot of work but it is worth it! Follow the instructions on the can).
The coocoo kitchen table! We love it!
I never had a round table growing up. Did you?

I really enjoy how close we are now when we are eating.  Since there is no chance I am going to be able to eat a meal without helping (at least) three other people, the round table makes it much easier for me to serve, cut food, wash hands and faces, and give Scary Mommy looks when the coocoo kids aren’t eating their food.
Thank you so much for allowing me to share today Roeshel!If you’d like to see more of my projects or meet the whole coocoo family head on over to mommy is coocoo.
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Painted Play Mat

Painted Floor Mat Tutorial

How to paint a foam playmat, floor mat, do it yourself, DIY, vintage restaurant sign, aged, distressed, lobster, beachy, New Orleans

My Inspiration: With a kitchen remodel nearly done, I’ve been looking for an accent rug for in front of the kitchen sink and stove area. I haven’t been able to find something I like but one I did spy several painted foam mats on Pinterest

Project Inspiration

painted foam playmat

please pin this image directly from Sarah.Wandering.

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Beautiful Bathroom Makeover

Meet:  Virginia from
LiveLoveDIY
who recently shared her guest bathroom reveal, beautiful and full of do-it-yourself details.

Involving Color

I’ve “known” Jena from Involving Color for quite awhile and I not only love her creativity and beautiful home, I love her site.  She has some new features and really helpful tools so I asked her to share a little about it today. It’s a site you’re going to want to pin or bookmark for when you’re trying to choose a paint color. See paint colors in “real” rooms. Here’s Jena:

Hi, I’m Jena from Involving Color, and I’m so excited to be guest posting here on The DIY Show Off! I’ve been a long time reader of Roeshel’s blog, so when she asked me to come share a little about my site with you guys, I was beyond excited.

Involving Color is a blog all about paint color. I have hundreds (and growing!) reader submitted rooms organized in galleries by paint color and room type. I even have a section just for painted furniture. I recently added a lot of functionality with an improved search and image tags, which I’ll talk about below.

DIY Project Parade and a Stairwell Landing Makeover using what we have.

Inspired by Shoshana earlier this week, I decided to do an accent wall at the top of our stairs. My decision was that quick and crazy. I bought NOTHING for this makeover. Leftover paint, supplies, and decorative accessories we already had on hand (+ the felted reindeer head, rug and clock I got for Christmas). Before was boring. {Check out that brass and faux-oak light – niiiiiiiice, huh? Good-bye!}

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DIY Project Parade ~ Sitting Room Before and After

My love of DIY is sometimes madness! We have an empty nest this year. We planned a vacation in December because it sounded good at the time to get away while it’s cold and snowy here and escape to somewhere warm and toasty.  However, it’s a busy time of year. I’m in a bit of a holiday panic.  Since we have so much going on, I thought I’d only put up our smaller pre-lit tree in the living room instead of our monster not pre-lit.  I rearranged furniture, vacuumed all over, set up and fluffed the little tree.  I didn’t realize it was so little – it looked lost.  Sad, really. I don’t think I even needed to rearrange furniture. It just wasn’t going to work. I had to bring up the monster.
So…time to move the little tree to our little sitting room. Only the walls were dingy. A DIY girl cannot decorate and just add Christmas to a blah sitting room! Of course not! So, 4 days before our trip (I hadn’t even packed yet)…I decided to freshen up the walls in our sitting room so that the tree would be happy there.
Sitting room before: I loved the color…it was just scuffed up and scratched and even dirty.
(prepping the room to paint)
Armed with Dutch Boy‘s Refresh paint and my Purdy paintbrush…I had this room repainted in no time flat! One coat. No taping.
You can see the difference here in progress. New wet paint…
Pretty new color is Dutch Boy’s Ypsilanti Skies (yes, I had to go look that up to spell it right only to discover that spell check already knew)….
 
Now it’s a lot fresher and brighter. I love the light blue/gray with the cherry furniture and green from the Christmas tree.
before
after

before

after

before

after

I even made a sign for our coat closet…

More after pictures:

DIY Ornament Wreath tutorial by Mommy is Coo Coo
Mine is a gift. Thanks, Amanda!

I‘ll be sharing a tutorial for the DIY curtain rod and DIY script dropcloth curtains and more coming soon!  :)

The DIY Show Off
Let’s see what you’ve been up to!
1. You must use the button above (ADD BUTTON HTML CODE FROM SIDE BAR TO YOUR POST) and link to this post to share the linky love. You post must be recent, shared at one DIY Project Parade only (not continuously) and be DIY related.

2.Include your name or blog name and project title. Add your permalink (not your blog url, but your DIY project post url). Feel free to link a Past Post, just invite your readers in a current post with a quick note.

3.Or email your link to thediyshowoff@gmail.com and I will add it for you.

4.If you notice your link has disappeared -please add the link back to The DIY Show Off to your post today, a button or a quick note to your readers about the party and try again! I love when everyone participates and readers check out everyone’s links, but I think the return favor of linking back is the nice thing to do so everyone plays fair and enjoys all of the projects and links. Also – this blog party is for DIY projects only. Links not related to DIY will be deleted. Please share your link one week only. 
5.  If reading this in an email, pop over to http://thediyshowoff.blogspot.com to see the inspiring DIY projects linked up!
6. If you have a Holiday link to share, feel free to link up to here too!

7.  NOW you can “like” the links!  What a fun idea!  Most liked links may be included in a post of DIY Project Parade highlights later in the week.
8.  Visit a few other links to make some new friends, get some creative ideas and feel free to leave me a comment. I’m likely sitting here on the computer and could use a happy distraction! 

Sharing here this week:

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DIY Project Parade ~ Custom Chalkboard Paint Tutorial and Edging Tips

I recently came across Christina’s chalkboard paint post from Designing by Numbers in the DIY Project Parade (thanks for the inspiration, Christina) and remembered that I had bookmarked Martha Stewart’s chalkboard recipe with grand plans that kept getting pushed back.  So, the next day I headed to True Value for supplies. (The True Value in Sarver, PA has a ‘mascot’…the sweetest dog who greets customers at the door, with a roll of duct tape in his mouth. Adorable.)
Our basement stairwell is a blank canvas.  Lots of plans, just needed to get started. 
BEFORE
I wanted a navy chalkboard so custom chalkboard paint was the solution. 
Color:  Benjamin Moore Hale Navy
I started with having my primer tinted.  Primer doesn’t really tint well, so the closest I could get was a bright periwinkle, but every little bit of pigment helps.
To make my project go quicker and because ceilings are high/scary and complicated, I use an edger. 
The secret to using this little treasure is dipping it into the paint at angle, keeping the wheels out of the paint. 
Then drag across up the ‘ramp’ of the paint tray to get off excess paint…
I “sneak up” on where the wall meets the ceiling and then move from side to side. (Don’t just smash down near the ceiling and start side to side.)  I also ‘smooth’ out the bottom of the edged paint line to keep it from dripping/building up and making a visible line. So: touch the edger to the wall below where you’re going to run your edging, then come back and smooth the line made from the bottom of the edger.
For high up/hard to reach places, I added an extension and stood on a ladder at terrifying heights (remember to keep as little as possible paint towards the side of the edger with wheels)…
Once the primer is applied and dried, it’s time to move on to the next step.

The recipe calls for 2 tbsp. of non sand grout for every cup of latex paint. Here’s the conversion for making one gallon of chalkboard paint:
2 tbsp. for 1 cup
16 cups in a gallon 
= 2 cups (32 tbsp.) of non sand grout in one gallon of paint

I used a 5 gallon bucket for mixing.
I alternated adding paint then a bit of grout (thanks to Christina for the tip). Then stirred.  Repeat until all paint and grout are mixed.
I used a paint stir. Tilting the bucket helps get the grout/paint mixed that sticks to the sides of the bucket.
The consistency is thick.  There are small clumps…keep stirring (a mixer-bit on the drill might be more helpful).  I did have a few bumps…but we’re not picky. Most dissolved or smoothed out with a paint brush (a little bit of a pain but overall – it was worth it). If we were perfectionists, we wouldn’t have bought an old fixer-upper farmhouse! This wall will actually be partially covered up (future project) and then a couple of years down the road, it’s being torn out when we get to the big basement renovation. The solution is to lightly sand between coats. 
Make sure you use a drop cloth and wear old clothes. Consistency is thick and splatters will occur. (Thankfully we have stairs waiting for slate tile…so although I was careful, it didn’t matter). A mask is preferable too. The fumes were on the strong side. Use same edging technique as mentioned above. 
I used a foam roller for the larger/middle task of painting the wall. 
Once I finished the wall, I put the lid on my bucket and my paint tray/roller in a baggy and let the wall paint dry overnight.
first coat, drying…
In progress but looking good!
Second day, second coat.  Next…the hard part. Rub the entire wall with the side of a piece of chalk. 
Then erase.
All set to accept chalk board writing!
More on our stairwell transformation coming up – you’ll never guess what we have planned.

Let’s see what you’ve been up to!

The DIY Show Off

1. You must use the button above (ADD BUTTON HTML CODE FROM SIDE BAR TO YOUR POST) and link to this post to share the linky love. You post must be recent, shared at one DIY Project Parade only (not continuously) and be DIY related.

2.Include your name or blog name and project title. Add your permalink (not your blog url, but your DIY project post url). Feel free to link a Past Post, just invite your readers in a current post with a quick note.

3.Or email your link to thediyshowoff@gmail.com and I will add it for you.

4.If you notice your link has disappeared -please add the link back to The DIY Show Off to your post today, a button or a quick note to your readers about the party and try again! I love when everyone participates and readers check out everyone’s links, but I think the return favor of linking back is the nice thing to do so everyone plays fair and enjoys all of the projects and links. Also – this blog party is for DIY projects only. Links not related to DIY will be deleted. Please share your link one week only. 

5.  If reading this in an email, pop over to http://thediyshowoff.blogspot.com to see the inspiring DIY projects linked up!
6. If you have a Holiday link to share, feel free to link up to here too!

7.  NOW you can “like” the links!  What a fun idea!  Most liked links may be included in a post of DIY Project Parade highlights later in the week.
8.  Visit a few other links to make some new friends, get some creative ideas and feel free to leave me a comment. I’m likely sitting here on the computer and could use a happy distraction! 

*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
I was one of the bloggers selected by True Value to work on the DIY Squad. I have been compensated for my time commitment to the program as well as my writing about my experience. I have also been compensated for the materials needed for my DIY project. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.
~*~*~*~*~
12 Bloggers, 12 Colors, 12 Days
of Holiday DIY

Dec. 1st ~ GREEN ~ The Design Confidential

Dec. 2nd ~ WHITE ~ Domestically Speaking

Dec. 3rd ~ BLUE/PURPLE ~ Fireflies & JellyBeans

Dec. 4th ~ SILVER ~ Freckled Laundry

Dec. 5th ~ GRAY ~ Primitive & Proper

Dec. 6th ~ SPARKLE/GLITTER ~ A Girl and a Glue Gun

Dec. 7th ~ MIRROR/CLEAR ~ The DIY Show Off

Dec. 8th ~ EARTH TONES ~ Making the World Cuter

Dec. 9th ~ RED ~ It’s So Very Cheri

Dec. 10th ~ GOLD ~ 504 Main

Dec. 11th ~ CHALKBOARD 

Dec. 12th ~ MULTI-COLOR ~ The DIY Club

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