Things We Fancy – Using Fabric as Wallpaper Tutorial

Meet:  Hillary & Breann from 
Things We Fancy
Why would you want to meet these talented ladies?  Because they’re new to blogging and DIY divas!  I’m loving these DIY tutorials…
AMAZING, huh? There’s more where that came from!  But, first…
Today they’re sharing their tutorial on how to use fabric as wallpaper – a beautiful solution for those of us with anti-wallpaper phobia (when you’ve scraped an entire house with layers upon layers of wallpaper, some even painted, some on ceilings…you understand the hate and fear of wallpaper).  This is gorgeous and the fact that it’s easily removable is a huge bonus! Not to mention fabric comes in so many beautiful designs, patterns and colors.  Welcome Hillary & Breann: 
{BEFORE}
{AFTER}

Directions:
  • take starch and poor into your paint tray
  • take your paint roller & roll starch on just part of the wall about a 24″x 24″ square
  • line up your fabric and stick it to the wall

Tips: They found it easier to thumb tack the corner and top to make sure it stayed and didn’t slide–{make sure to always start at the top corner}[also make sure to leave about an inch extra on the top, bottom, and sides. the fabric shrinks about 1/2"].
  • after putting your fabric on, take your roller and roll starch over the top.
Tip: {fabric should be soaking with starch}-also when using the roller brush only roll upwards. if you you roll the roller down, all the starch comes gushing out of the roller-

  • continue doing the same thing with the rest of the panel & each one after that.

Tip: {it would be a good idea to place thumb tacks through out the whole process. especially where the panels overlap.}
  • once your wall is completely dry, go over it again with starch to get all the air bubbles out
  • after that dries, take your rotary cutter and cut the excess fabric off the sides.

Tip: [using a rotary cutter [or razor blade] was the best way to get a smooth straight cut. scissors… no bueno.]

For more information or questions, visit Hillary and Breann and their awesome DIY at
Things We Fancy

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DIY Stenciled Wallpaper

Meet:  Heather from

Heather just started a DIY-Organic Food-and-Soiree blog!  She’s a full time teacher but in her spare time she enjoys helping others decorate their homes on a budget, entertaining and cooking.  

With a small budget, Heather gave her dining room wall a new look.  $15!  Using paint pens, she created this DIY stenciled wallpaper:  

Helloooooo beautiful! Look at that diva chandelier sneaking into the beautiful wall’s close up!  Love her too!

Big improvement from the boring before:

The power of paint never ceases to thrill me. $15,a little DIY and Heather’s dining room looks completely glamorous! Reminds me why I put make up on before leaving the house! 

Gorgeous job, Heather!  After scraping layers of wallpaper off so many walls and even ceilings, THIS is my idea of wallpaper!  I’ve done it in my own home too and really love to personalize the “wallpaper” look!  Thank you so much for sharing!
See the HOW TO at The Lovely Cupboard for the full tutorial.  Know what else you can see?  DIY project going on in Heather’s 1943 cottage.  Kitchen envy and more!

Have you stenciled a wall in your home?  Feel free to include a link in the comments so we can all check it out!
~*~*~*~

Last day to enter the vintage doorknob hanger giveaway!

Stenciled Walls

Closet before:  
Now with beautiful new color thanks to Dutch Boy Refresh paint.  It’s a light blue called Fountain of Youth. The perfect backdrop for a fresh new look.  Speaking of fresh!  Not only is Dutch Boy Refresh paint zero VOC, check out the key features:
  • Exceptional hide and durability
  • Gives mildew-resistant coating
  • ZeroVOC / Greenguard® Indoor Air Quality Certified

Tools needed:
  1. Cutting Edge Stencil’s “Whispering Elm Wall Pattern Stencil
  2. 3 different colors of paint (I used less than 1/2 a quart for the closet.  It doesn’t take much.) Our stencil was made using Mythic Paints in Woodbury and Bleached linen for the pattern.
  3. 3 foam rollers
  4. Paper towels
  5. Paint tray or foam plate
  6. 3 pieces of painter’s tape
The stencil comes with very easy to read directions, tips and tricks.  At first, I felt overwhelmed with placement and where to start.  I chose the right top corner of the wall since this is the most viewed side of the closet.  No measuring required.  Once I developed a pattern (eyeballing stencil placement), the rhythm and pace sped up.
1. Place the stencil on the wall (secure with a piece of painter’s tape).
2.  Roll the foam roller into the paint, covering the roller.  Then roll on folded paper towels to evenly coat the roller.
3.  Roll over the open areas of the stencil. 
4.  Repeat until entire wall is covered in the 1st stencil pattern.
5.  Repeat with Steps 1-4 for Stencil #2 and then with Stencil #3.
6.  Clean stencils by laying them in the utility sink under running water and rubbing with a sponge.  Hang to dry.
Tips:  Use a clean foam roller for each color/stencil. After coating the roller with paint and rolling on the paper towel, roller is good for about 3 turns with the stencil. Again – no measuring required.  It’s magic.  Okay, maybe not but the pattern works out and imperfections aren’t noticeable.
Here is closet after with the look of painted wallpaper.  No ripped or torn wallpaper in the future, no wallpaper removal. There is no lighting yet in the closet so colors are off a little in pictures.  
 “I love wallpaper patterns but after tons of wallpaper scraping in our old farmhouse, I will never apply wallpaper.  Scraping wallpaper is my least favorite DIY project.  Using the cutting edge stencil was the super easy. Little prep, little clean up and once I got a rhythm going, it went quickly. I love that it looks like wallpaper but I chose the colors, it was so much less expensive and I did it myself!”


Closet now. 

Stenciled Walls

 “I love wallpaper patterns but after tons of wallpaper scraping in our old farmhouse, I will never apply wallpaper.  Scraping wallpaper is my least favorite DIY project.  Using the cutting edge stencil was the super easy. Little prep, little clean up and once I got a rhythm going, it went quickly. I love that it looks like wallpaper but I chose the colors, it was so much less expensive and I did it myself!”
Closet before:  
Now with beautiful new color thanks to Dutch Boy Refresh paint.  It’s a light blue called Fountain of Youth. The perfect backdrop for a fresh new look.  Speaking of fresh!  Not only is Dutch Boy Refresh paint zero VOC, check out the key features:
  • Exceptional hide and durability
  • Gives mildew-resistant coating
  • ZeroVOC / Greenguard® Indoor Air Quality Certified

Tools needed:
  1. Cutting Edge Stencil’s “Whispering Elm Wall Pattern Stencil
  2. 3 different colors of paint (Roeshel used less than 1/2 a quart for her closet.  It doesn’t take much.) Roeshel used Mythic Paints in Woodbury and Bleached linen in her pattern.
  3. 3 foam rollers
  4. Paper towels
  5. Paint tray or foam plate
  6. 3 pieces of painter’s tape
The stencil comes with very easy to read directions, tips and tricks.  At first, I felt scared with placement and where to start.  I chose the right top corner of the wall since this is the most viewed side of the closet.  No measuring required.  Once she developed a pattern (eyeballing stencil placement), the rhythm and pace sped up.
1. Place the stencil on the wall (secure with a piece of painter’s tape).
2.  Roll the foam roller into the paint, covering the roller.  Then roll on folded paper towels to evenly coat the roller.
3.  Roll over the open areas of the stencil. 
4.  Repeat until entire wall is covered in the 1st stencil pattern.
5.  Repeat with Steps 1-4 for Stencil #2 and then with Stencil #3.
6.  Clean stencils by laying them in the utility sink under running water and rubbing with a sponge.  Hang to dry.
Tips:  Use a clean foam roller for each color/stencil. After coating the roller with paint and rolling on the paper towel, roller is good for about 3 turns with the stencil. Again – no measuring required.  It’s magic.  Okay, maybe not but the pattern works out and imperfectio
ns aren’t noticeable.
Here is closet after with the look of painted wallpaper.  No ripped or torn wallpaper in the future, no wallpaper removal. There is no lighting yet in the closet so colors are off in pictures.  The walls are a very light aqua blue and the stencils are in a light tan/white and silvery green. What do you think?

Frugal Home Ideas


Stef
says she’s fairly new to blogging, but I say she’s a pro at before/after and DIY! From the moment I laid eyes on her before/afters, I couldn’t wait to share with you. Check out her blog post:

Entryway:

Before
After
You can see how I created my wall art here.
Front Living Room
Before
After
Before
After
You can see how I did this CRAZY EASY Wall art here
Before
After
Did you know you can spray paint blinds? Holy Moly!
Living / Dining Combo
Before
Don’t you just love the use of orangy wood and gallons and gallons of poly?
After
Before
After
Okay, I don’t know why my sectional looks purple in photos. I really have to upgrade my camera situation, because these pictures are really bad.
Dining
Before
After
See how I made these mirrors here ($40), and how to do this wall treatment here ($35)
Kitchen
Before
After
Before
After
It still needs some major work (and a new vent a hood), but at least you don’t have to shield your eyes from the blindingly (is that a word?) shiny orangy-oak cabinets.
On the list is to get a new backsplash. I will discuss my backsplash disaster and why there is a baseboard on my countertop in a future post.
Before
After
"font-size:large;">Nursery
Before
After
Stay tuned for future posts about how I made those floating shelves (and frames) for under $10
and how I made that collection of framed animal prints for under $20 (including frames)
Master Bedroom
Before
After
This is actually beadboard wallpaper on the walls
See… beadboard

Hope you enjoyed my home tour. You can look at the befores and afters of our first home flip (1916 craftsman bugalow) here.

AMAZING! So much DIY tutorials and before/afters in one post! Heaven!

Stef! I sure did enjoy the tour (and your first home flip) and I can’t wait to see future projects. You are a DIY superhero! Great job and the details and rooms look GORGEOUS! Thanks so much for allowing me to show it off.

What do you guys think? Love her, don’t you? What are you waiting for? Click her header picture at the beginning of this post and see more!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The giveaway is coming together! There are some really talented and awesome vendors joining in! I can’t wait to show off their shops and celebrate the milestones with you!

I’m still trying to catch up on visiting a few of you…thanks for your patience. As you can imagine, it’s been a crazy couple of weeks (if you were here early – you might have caught my blooper! Sorry Stef!). Have a great day!

Handpainted Wallpaper & a Gorgeous Dining Room Makeover from A Penny Saved

Hi DIY-ers! You’re in for a treat. This DIY project is one of my favorites. It’s stunning, so creative and an amazing DIY transformation. I’ve introduced you to

before with her gorgeous DIY Chandelier tutorial.

Remember?

Well…she has more budget friendly tricks. Make sure you visit her blog, click her DIY label and be prepared to be inspired and become a follower. Because the beauty she creates is something anyone can do.

Her DIY wallpaper is gorgeous. I love it even better than the pricey Farrow and ball wallpaper that inspired her to come up with such a creative inexpensive option.

Here is her post:

Dining Room Tour

This is what the room looked like soon after we moved into our house in January:
I loved the judge’s paneling, but I knew I wanted to go with a lighter, softer color, and that I wanted to do something a little crazy on the walls. After moving from house to house every 1-3 years for my entire life (my dad was military and you can read about our recent house-jumping here) I’m ready to put down roots and make a house my own.

I considered wallpaper and fell in love with “Silvergate” from Farrow and Ball:
But at several hundred dollars for the rolls I would need to paper the Dining Room, I knew I had to pass it up. So I decided to paint an enlarged version of the Silvergate pattern on my walls. I started sketching and filling in with paint, and before long I had this:And after what seemed like an eternity of sketching, erasing, and painting, I finished! There are tons of imperfections in the pattern, but I’m holding my inner perfectionist at bay and trying really hard to ignore them. There’s no guarantee that I won’t constantly be touching up and “fixing” things, though. But for right now I’m happy with it.

And the total cost for the “mural” comes to $30! I bought 2 cans of Behr Interior Flat Enamel for $15 each on sale, but I barely put a dent in either can, so I will be able to paint other rooms with both colors!

Now onto the details:
yle="margin: 0px auto 10px; cursor: pointer; display: block; height: 536px; text-align: center; width: 381px;" border="0" />I bought this set of chairs at a yard sale a few years ago for $90 and recently gave them a facelift by recovering them and giving them a little pleated ruffle (check out the how-to here). I spent $8 on fabric and was given the foam for free, so the total I spent on these chairs comes to $98.

The braided chenille rug came from JC Penney Outlet a year ago for $30!

The table came from an auction in Missouri about 5 years ago and was a whopping $25! Keith and I refinished it and now it’s one of our favorite pieces of furniture. Don’t you love the lazy susan?

My mom very graciously helped me sew the drapes. The fabric was on sale at JoAnn’s for $2/yard and I think total we used 9 yards. We lined them with queen bed sheets that we found at Anna’s Linens for $6 each. I love how full and heavy they feel. Total cost = $30.

The shutters came from a yard sale a few years ago. My mom found several for $8 each, but when she got them home not a single one fit any window in her house. She held onto them, though, and magically, every one of them fits a window in our new house! They also happen to match the trim color perfectly.

The curtain hardware is from Ikea and cost around $15 for everything, including the glass finials.

This buffet came from a yard sale in Illinois a few years ago and was $100. That’s a bit of a splurge for me, but this piece has been worth every cent.

The convex mirror came from JC Penney outlet a few years ago and cost $30. I had searched everywhere for one of these, but was always disappointed with the $100+ price tag, so $30 seemed like a good deal.

I just purchased the lamp with birthday money off craigslist for $20, and those cute white ceramic apples were $6 at a recent yard sale. The crystal candlesticks were a gift from my parents.

Grand Total for our “wallpapered” Dining Room = $392!

How She Did It
I have been asked to share my tips and methods for creating a mural like the one I just completed in my Dining Room.
This is really scary to me because I really don’t have a “process” or “methods”. As with most projects I do, I just jumped right in with a half-baked idea and no clue as to how I would successfully pull it off. So instead of sharing with you what I did, I will tell you what I should have done. Ready?

1. Decide on a pattern and colors. (I actually did this step!!!) Pick something that you think is classic and that you can live with for years to come. Look at wallpapers, fabric, art, magazines, etc. to find some inspiration. Mine was this wallpaper from Farrow & Ball:

Then decide which colors you want to use. I chose to only use 2 colors since the pattern was so busy: “Granite Dust” by Valspar and a custom match to the trim in our house, which I think is Sherwin Williams “Antique White”. Remember to think about staying power when deciding which colors and pattern to use – you don’t want to decide a year from now that you don’t really like your mural after all your hard work!

2. Decide how you’re going to transfer the pattern to the walls. You can free-hand it, get an overhead (check craigslist and rentals first!), make a pattern from cardboard to trace on the walls, or draw a grid on both your pattern and the walls and use it to sketch the design. I free-handed mine, but if I had been able to find an overhead I’m sure it would have gone much faster!

3. Lay out the design. (I skipped this step – oops!) If you have an overhead, a pattern or a grid, figure out how your design will fit on each wall. If you’re free-handing it, you can still try to determine where
how big your design should be, what should be centered on the wall and how the designs on each wall will meet. You may want to enlarge your design (I enlarged mine considerably) to make things easier and faster.

4. Gather supplies. Buy your paint. I recommend going with a low-sheen if you’re doing a more detailed design. I ended up painting over parts of my design and re-doing them, and a low-sheen paint hides the imperfections. You’ll also need a pencil or two, a good eraser, some decent paintbrushes of different sizes, and possibly a ladder and dropcloth.

5. (Optional – I certainly didn’t have the foresight to do this!) You may want to do a mock-up of your design on a piece of cardboard or wood. Practice sketching and different brushstrokes. Then hold the board up in your room to make sure you like the design and colors.

6. Paint your base color

7. Start sketching! Use whatever method you’ve decided to start transferring the pattern to the wall. Try to draw lightly so that your pencil marks will be more easily covered up by the paint. Keep in mind your layout and how you want your design to fit on your walls. If you mess up, just erase it! If it’s a pretty big screw-up (I had several of those) you can paint over your marks in the base color.

8. Fill in with paint. Try hard not to be a perfectionist. Just fill in your design and have fun. I personally like the look of longer, freer strokes, even if they are a little messier.

9. Go back with your base color and clean up edges and stray pencil marks.

A few tips:
* You may want to work in sections instead of sketching the whole design and then painting it all. This made it seem to go faster, and if you drag your project out over weeks like I did, it looks more finished to have a section or two completed instead of a whole room in progress.

* I am a big fan of Behr Interior Flat Enamel. It is very low sheen, but it is smoother feeling than most flat paints and it’s scrubbable. It’s also only $17 a gallon!
* Try not to choose a pattern with symmetry, especially if you’re free-handing. If I had taken the time to think about this before jumping in, I would have realized that my pattern required that my main wall be perfectly symmetrical. This made things very difficult!
* Don’t obsess over the imperfections. I’m working on this one. It’s hard, but the imperfections are what make it art.
* Consider doing this on one accent wall instead of the whole room for a “pop”.

Okay, pick your jaw up from the floor…are you as jealous as I am? I love the colors and the design. I love every DIY detail. I love that it’s not real wallpaper (for future changing – although I don’t think I’d ever get tired of looking at these walls). What do you think?

Britt – Your painted wallpaper is so much prettier than the one from Farrow and Ball and a HUGE impressive difference in price. Thank you SO much for allowing me to show off your beautiful dining room and inspirational blog full of DIY projects!

Beadboard Wallpaper – DIY from Southern Hospitality

You guys know I love each and every submission, right? YOU are what makes The DIY Show Off fun! I’d like to introduce you to another DIY design star. Another amazing and talented lady, another inspirational blog full of DIY ideas. Rhoda from Southern Hospitality comes up with some of the best DIY projects (framing my mirror was inspired by her). She also was the first one that I know to work with the beadboard wallpaper that I’ve seen at home improvement stores and always stopped to wonder about. And as usual, she’s amazing. I can’t tell that it’s not actual beadboard, can you? It’s so pretty! Here is her helpful post with step-by-step instructions, photos and results:

Beadboard Wallpaper Project

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Let’s just start by saying this! I’m totally sold on the beadboard wallpaper.

Well, girls I just have to tell you that this project was even easier and looks better than I could imagine. If anyone had doubts about it from my first post, this just might change your mind. This beadboard wallpaper is amazing, that’s all I can say about it. It’s thick, probably 3-4 times thicker than regular wallpaper and I’ve put up regular wallpaper many time before. This is SO much easier to work with. You can cut it with scissors and it cuts like buttah. No shredding or crinkling. So, for those of you who LOVE the details…this one’s for you. Lots of pics, lots of details. I promise you, anyone can do this project. It went so well and turned out so pretty that I’m going to do something else with it. And I know that diehard REAL beadboard lovers will probably pooh-pooh this (and I am a REAL beadboard fan myself), but for those of us who do not have a garage full of power tools, this is the next best thing. I’ll go through the steps I used to get it all up there and trimmed out, so follow along with me.

For those who missed the Home Depot link in my first post, click here to order the wallpaper. This is the best price I found on it. It’s by Graham Brown and made in the UK.

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So first thing is to measure wherever you are putting it and get yourself a yardstick to help keep a straight line. Measure on each side and hold the yardstick across and draw a line side to side with a pencil. That’s how I did it and it worked great. And trimming from top to bottom is easy, you just follow the lines.

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Wet the back of it in the sink, let sit for 5 minutes. Book it, Dano. I really wanted to say that. :) Anyone besides me remember Hawaii 5-0? Guess cause I am 5-0, I would. Booking is when you let glue sit and activate so it adheres better. Now, here’s something I didn’t do. I didn’t sand my cabinets at all. I just went right over the painted surface, which was a little glossy, but it seemed to stick just fine and I didn’t have any problems with it. But, to be safe, you might want to lightly sand or degloss if your surface is glossy. That’s my disclaimer. I tend to take shortcuts, as you’ve probably all figured out by now. :)

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My plain jane ends of the kitchen cabinets. Nothing special, but this treatment really makes them look SO much better.

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Also an issue when we got our granite, to keep the countertops level, they had to add some shims underneath, which you can see (well, you can if you’re on your head, which doesn’t happen too much, but still) and I wanted to get some molding around the top of the cabinets to fix that little issue. So, this all worked together for me. I bought a small molding MDF piece that fits underneath the granite and then some fancier reeded trim, not too wide to trim out the beadboard. Keep that in mind. To make this all come together and really look good, the extra trim made all the difference too. When you look at the finished product, the trim makes it appear to be the real thing. Now you wouldn’t necessarily HAVE to add the trim under the countertop like I did, but I had that issue to deal with, so I needed to do that. You may not.

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Another look at the shims under the granite. You’ll see at the end how it all works.

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First thing, I cut and pasted my wallpaper pieces. Only 2 of the ends had to be pieced and you can see the small seam to the right. Not a big deal to me, since regular beadboard also has seams. And I did go back and fill in with some spackle which didn’t totally erase it, but made it less noticeable. If I had worked a little bit harder with it, it probably could have totally disappeared, but have I mentioned I’m not a perfectionist? I’m a “if it looks good, then I’m OK with it” kind of girl. So, that’s the first step. Cut, paste and smooth it out. Make sure you smooth all the bubbles out after you get it in place before it dries. That really wasn’t a problem. I just used my hands to smooth it out and it totally lays flat. No bubbles or anything.

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So, this is what it looks like on one end after the paper is in place. Not bad at all, huh? Lookin’ good already and it’s not even painted OR trimmed out. Wait til you get to the bottom pics.

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I did this on the top cabinet too. Same process. See the good thing about this method is, if you were using real beadboard it would really stick out from the cabinets pretty far and you’d have to get some bigger trim to trim it out and hide the edges. This way, the wallpaper just snuggles right up to the existing molding and then all I had to do was add molding on the right side and bottom to trim it all out. You’ll see in a minute. This doesn’t add a lot of unnecessary bulk to your cabinets, BUT you get the same look.

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Again, the small cabinet above the fridge got the same treatment.

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Here’s the spackle I used. I used it on the seams and also in the bigger gaps that I had with the old molding and new molding in a couple of spots. Spackle and caulk is your friend, as I told you when I did this project. You can hide a world of sins with caulk. :) Believe me, I know.

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Next up is the molding just under the granite to hide that ugly. I used my miter box and trimmed it to fit each angle and put that molding all the way around the kitchen cabinets under the granite. Used finish nails and wood glue to put it on here. I am NOT a good finish nailer. You will see in the final pics that some of my nail heads are sticking out. They kept bending and I couldn’t get all of them in all the way. Oh well. I really don’t care too much, I just painted over them. :) A real carpenter would fire me. Again, caulk or wood putty goes in the corner to fill in for painting.

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Nailing and gluing. Next you’ll see the reeded wood molding I used on the edges of the beadboard wallpaper. This is small and dainty and I like how it looks and it sort of mimics the beadboard effect. I just added it right on top of the wallpaper and flush with the edge of the cabinet corner. Again, you’ll caulk on both sides if there’s a little gap.

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Mitered the corners where they meet. Again, nailed and glued with wood glue to get it on here. I’m not great at measuring, but again, it just takes some patience and perseverance and YOU can do it too.

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So, one by one, they all got the trim molding attached. Everything got caulked. Wherever you see any gaps inside or out should be caulked. That just makes the final paint job look so much better if you do this.

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Caulked and ready for paint.

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Same in the master bath. I did both vanities in there too. After all the caulking and nailing, then it’s time for paint.

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I love to use this small weinie roller I got at Lowes for projects like this. Works great and with the small brush, they work together well. I rolled the paint on the wallpaper and used the brush to go back and smooth out around the edges and on the molding. When we moved here over 3 years ago, I discovered our doors throughout the house were primed but never painted, so I had to track down a good trim paint color in gloss to paint all the doors and match our existing trim . I also noticed that the trim color that was already here matched the kitchen and bathroom cabinets to a T, so it made it easy once I got the right match of paint to touch up the kitchen cabinets and all the trimwork. In case anyone is interested, I got Anthem White from Valspar (Lowes) and it’s a perfect match to my trim and cabinets. If I was choosing trim paint myself, I probably would have chosen a creamier white, this one is a little bright white for me, but bright white does look good next to other colors. And I wasn’t about to paint out all my trim just to change the color. This one is just fine thank you.

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So, after 2 coats of Anthem White on it all, here they are! I just LOVE how this turned out and would do it again in a minute. I’ve already got plans to add some of this to the master bathroom walls around the whirlpool tub.

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Nice huh? Would you ever think that this is not the real thing? I really don’t think that someone coming in our house would ever know the difference even up close. The paper actually has a little texture to it that mimics wood.

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Here you can see my messy nails, but that’s OK. It’s not bad if you’re not right on top of it. And see, you can barely see the seam after it’s all painted. I did try to sink the nails, but I’m not all that good with counter-sinking. I may go back and work on those nails a bit better.

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Side panel by the dishwasher.

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Looks great to me!

End Cab

From a distance. This is how most people will see them anyway, not up close.

top cab

Little cab above the fridge. The great part about painting is that you seal down the edges at the top and sides and it totally looks seamless. I did 2 coats of white high gloss trim paint on it.

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Bathroom cabinet

Other bath cab

Another angle.

Bath cab

So, that’s it! I hope this will inspire some of you to try this too. It’s a no-brainer for those of you like me who do not have power tools at home and don’t want to get into major remodeling with the real stuff. I think this gives exactly the same look for a fraction of the cost. Not to mention, you don’t have to remove any molding to use this. It goes right up next to what you already have, which to me is ideal even if you wanted to use it in a small bathroom on the walls. No removing the baseboard molding. All you’d have to do is put up the wallpaper, add some chair rail molding on top and that’s it. I’m SOLD on it and I hope you’ll try it too and let me know how it works for you. I know if you have small children that tend to run into cabinets like this, it might be a problem, but for most areas without high energy kids around, you would be fine, I have no doubt.

I can see all sorts of possibilities for using this: Back of a hutch or kitchen cabinets with glass fronts, powder room or small bath on the walls under chair rail, inset in a piece of furniture (drawer or door), on the end of a headboard or footboard with recessed panels, on a ceiling, lots of possibilities. So, what are you waiting for?

I spent a total of $50 on the wallpaper AND trim for this little project. Can you say a LOT of bang for the buck?! And I’m not stopping with this. I’ve got some left and will definitely be putting it to good use.

Isn’t that awesome? I love it. Now click over and browse her archives full of beautiful DIY inspiration, amazing transformations and fun parties!